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I 



Regis College 



Denver, Colorado 



Volume Ho. 48 




DEDICATION 



Peter A. Rotar 




Hector Franco 




Although Regis is a Jesuit college, 

Roughlu, one- third of the daij-time facultu. 

Is composed of lawmen 

Who are si/mpathetic to the aims of Jesuit 

education. 

Theij teach almost everu, subject in the curriculum, 

English, languages, education, 

The social and the natural sciences. 

Theu, are strongest in the Department of 

Commerce and Finance. 

V/eru, few students leave the college without, 

At some time, 

Having been influenced bu, a member of the lau, 

facultu,. 

And ijet, 

Because Regis is a Jesuit institution, 

The average student is liable to overlook the efforts 

Of the lai( facultq. 

In recognition of their valuable contributions; 

To Regis, 

To Regis' standing in the academic world, 

To Regis students, 

We respectfullq dedicate this, 

The 1960 Ranger, 

To the Regis College lai/ facultq. 



Dr. Theodore 5. Eliot 





Dr. Francis J. Ozog 



Donald A. Klene 




i 





9SBk 
Arthur U/. Kaleher 




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George E. Bechtolt 



Mtjles J. Dolan 





Rudu. Sporcich 



Joseph B. Hall 




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Michael E. Endres 






U/illiam 5. Levings 



James E. Belton 



Bernard V. Sheehan 






rfHBCV- A 




Louis Gachic 



Glen O. Stocking 



John A. Flanagan 




H^Hi 



FOREWORD 

A college like Regis 

is not built; 

It is planted and grows. 

It has deep roots to 

draw nourishment. 

It blossoms, bears fruit, 

And, conceivably 

it could even die. 

VA/e don't think Regis will 

die though. 

It roots are too deep 

for that. 

It has grown strong and healthu, 

o\/er the qears. 

But most of all, 

it will not die 

because it is made up 

of living members. 

These members, facultq, 

students, 

All who, in some u/aq, 

have been touched 

bu. the influence 

of Regis 

are the college's vital 

element. 

Theu. are its 

human element. 



EDITOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



Terru, Welsh 

Bill Marvel 

Mike Klein 

Ed Feulner 

SPORTS EDITOR Ben Cosimi 

BUSINESS MANAQER Jim Taqlor 




FACULTY 



20 



AWARDS 



. . CLASSES 



COLLEQE LIFE 



SPORTS 



. ADVERTISING 



30 



46 



88 



146 



ORGANIZATIONS \82 



214 



OREWORD 

college like Regis 
is not built; 

Human 

Element: 

Faces 





* 



Faces have 


[ 


mobility. Theq ore 
extensions 




of the personality 
like fingers ore 
extensions 
of the hand. 




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Theu, are 




expressive. 




Theu, fix 




our emotions 




and attitudes 




in time and space 


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for others to see. 
Faces warn, 


Hi' 


plead, 






laugh, 






pout, 






or even prau,. 










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On these pages 
is a 

collection 
of faces- 
Regis faces. 
Thei/ merit qour 
attention. 








Theu, wear 

various expressions- 
intent, 
studious, 
worried, 
cheerful, 
delirious- 
depending upon the 
outlook of the 
individual. 
But. 

taken collectivelq, 
theq are one face, 
the face 
of 
Regis. 



/ 



u 



V/erif Reverend 

Richard F. Ri/an, 5. J. 

President 

Regis College 



I 



THE PRESIDENT 



The President of Regis College, the Verif Rev/. 
Richard F. Rqan, S.J., is an example of perpetual 
motion. He is on the move so constantly that 
the heads of most Regis students would swim if 
theu, w/ere aware of the overwhelming multitude 
of duties, appointments, commitments, and 
hard work Fr. Rqan undertakes in a single dau,. 

In one week Father has been known to travel 
manu, thousands of miles to half a dozen 
different cities, host open houses and dinners 
for Regis supporters, make speech after speech 
to alumni, parents, and friends of the college. 
Added to this, he makes it a point to greet 
individuallt/ each person attending these affairs 
and through all these exerting tasks to remain 
as pleasant and affable as alwaifs. 

Anu. dau, of the week, Fr. Rqan can be seen on 
the campus talking to the students and faculty 
members, for he has always maintained that 
personal contact with these people and an open 
ear to their problems and suggestions are an 
asset in the successful performance of his job 
as college administrator. 



\^^ 








ADMINISTRATION 

IN o one remembers quite when education joined the ranks 
of big business. But it did, and the result is that even the 
smallest liberal arts college now presents administrative diffi- 
culties as complex as those of a large corporation. 

For the college, survival in this new environment has 
demanded the evolution of a new kind of administrator. No 
longer just an educator, the modern administrator must be a 
financier, personnel manager, and public relations man all 
in one. In order to make the community aware of his college 
and its problems, he must combine the talents of a super- 
salesman and a panhandler. He must surround himself with 
other administrators, capable men who can take some par- 
ticular problem — publicity, registrations, student affairs — 
and solve it. 

During the last few years, Regis has made a transition; 
it is no longer a small college with small college problems. 
Three new buildings show the extent of its physical growth. 
Its respected position in the region's cultural life evidences 
its intellectual growth. 

The administration of Regis College can take pride in 
their work. Regis' prestige is at an all-time high. 




Rev. Harry E. Hoewischer, S.J., Dean of Men 



Fran A. Kiene, Director Evening Division 




■«r- 




Richard J. Connor, Jr., Publicity 



Martin C. Kelly, Assistant to the President 




Rev. John J. Gibbons, S.J., Registrar 



Rev. Thomas Sheehy, S.J., Minister 




Paul Dougherty, Business Manager 



John V. Coyne, Assistant to the Dean 




Devoting many hours to the improvement of the Regis place- 
ment service, Bill Whelan, Vice-President, took great strides in 
the betterment of Regis-CWC relations. 




4tik 



Instrumental in presenting this year's Freshman Initiation was 
Student Senate Director, George Coughlin, who became known 
to the Executive Board as the brilliant spokesman for the 
Denver students. 



STUDENT 
ADMINISTRATION 



l\ sparkling victory was scored last year by the 
1959-1960 Executive Board as all seven members 
of the same group, Party X, were swept into the 
administrative offices of the Regis College Stu- 
dent Senate. 

Adhering closely to their platform, the Execu- 
tive Board took major strides in improving re- 
lations between Regis and other area colleges by 
co-sponsoring a highly successful social evening 
with the young ladies of Colorado Women's 
College. 

Regis' first Ranger Day was skillfully engi- 
gineered, produced, and directed by the seven 
executive officers with the able cooperation of all 
student clubs. 

Through the efforts of the Directors a survey 
was taken of all 1958-1959 Freshmen to determine 
the best type of frosh orientation program and the 
revamped initiation was based on the survey's 
conclusions. 

The Regis Placement Service was given many 
hours of Student Senate time for its improvement. 
A regular column in the Brown and Gold as well 
as a KREG radio show served to publicize stu- 
dent government. 

In the fall of 1959 the by-laws of the Senate 
constitution were completely re-written under the 
direction of an Executive Board member and were 
approved by the General Assembly in late winter. 



Quick with eloquent and precise terminologies Dave Sprehe, Secre- 
tary, gained recognition with prompt accounting of Student Senate 
operations and by re-chartering all student organizations and 
coordinating all activities. 



Conducting a comprehensive study of Regis' membership in the 
National Student Association was Director Mike Klein who also 
was the overseer of much promotion for student affairs. 




Executive Board, left to right: 



Skillful engineer for 1959s sue- 
presiding officer of the Execu- 
student body president, Blair 





Ben Cosimi, Director; Terry Welsh, Treasurer; Dave Sprehe, Secretary; Blair Farrell, President; Bill Whelan, Vice-President; Mike Klein, Director; George Coughlin, Director. 

cessful Ranger Day and Dozens of details for all elections on the campus were efficiently Insuring maximum benefits from minimum investments was the 

tive Board, was untiring managed by tireless Director, Ben Cosimi, one of the imaginative consistent task of Terry Welsh, capable Treasurer, who undertook 

Farrell. and efficient editors of the Student Handbook. this difficult work of properly administrating student activities funds. 





Fathers Stansell and Bocklage and Mr. Sheehan discuss mutual problems after classes in Loyola hall. 






P robablu. Regis' greatest asset is its 
faculttf— the Jesuits, with some 400 
years of collective experience \r\ 
educating, and a dedicated, capable 
lau, faculty Priests, counselors and 
teachers, theu. plant the seeds of 
culture in a sometimes arid .soil. 



FACULTY 




HEAD OF THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, the Rev. 
Robert Boyle, S.J., has insisted upon rigid aca- 
demic standards. 



MR. PETER A. ROTAR, Assistant Professor of Busi- 
ness Administration, acquired his Master's degree 
from the Harvard School of Business. 



A FACULTY MEMBER of 32 years, the Rev. Bernard 
J. Murray, is the spiritual director of Carroll Hall. 




FACULTY 



MR. GLEN O. STOCKING, the Director of the Department of Education, 
comes to Regis from the University of Denver. 



J\ sk any Regis student why he picked this college. 
First, he might speak of a friend who directed him to 
Regis, or a father or brother who attended school here, 
or perhaps the natural setting and agreeable climate of 
Denver. But then, he will pause, reflect, and add, "And 
of course I wanted a Jesuit education." 

What is it about the Jesuits that evokes this re- 
sponse? It is true that the Jesuits have had over 400 
years of experience in educating young men. They are in 
charge of some 28 colleges and universities in the United 
States alone, which means that there are some 120,000 
students sitting in Jesuit classrooms across the country. 
This is impressive. 

But it doesn't really explain the phenomenon called 
a Jesuit education. The real explanation begins with a 
few basic principles: the Jesuits believe in the doctrine 
called Christian humanism. As it is delineated in the 
Ratio Studioium, Christian humanism is a broadly cul- 
tural discipline. It is attained chiefly through the study 





A NEWCOMER TO REGIS, the Rev. Thomas Finucane, S.J., instructs Regis 
underclassmen in the science of accounting. 



A MEMBER OF THE Department of Philosophy, the Rev. Francis Malacelc, 
S.J., teaches courses in metaphysics and ethics. 









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MR. DONALD KLENE, who holds an MA. and a law degree, is an 
assistant professor of English Literature. 



THE REV. EDWARD H. WINTERGALEN, S.J., is moderator of the BROWN 
AND GOLD and an assistant professor of economics. 



of scholastic philosophy and theology, and it pre- 
supposes a foundation of classical and modern lan- 
guages, history, mathematics, physical sciences, and 
social studies. 

Its aim, then, and the aim of Jesuit education, is the 
development of- — and this phrase is repeated so often that 
it has almost become a cliche — "the whole man." The 
work of the Jesuit college is not only to produce men 
who are morally better. It goes beyond this to the train- 
ing of all the faculties of man — natural and supernatural. 
Its end is the rational supposit man, intellect and will, 
body and soul. 

Aims, no matter how lofty, must be carried out in 
the practical order. Often, educating the whole man de- 
pends upon such day-to-day matters as grading papers 
and preparing lectures. At Regis, the lights in Main Hall, 
where the Jesuit faculty lives, are often on very late at 
night and occasionally, into the early morning hours. 

The whole structure rests upon a single point: the 
personal contact between student and teacher. 




THEOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, spiritual advisor, retreat master and 
fessor, the Rev. Walter Harris, S.J., is a familiar sight on campus. 




AN INSTRUCTOR in Latin and Greek, the Rev. THE REV. JOSEPH V. DOWNEY, S.J., is pro- 
Matthew R. Lynch, S.J., brings a rare enthusiasm fessor of physics and custodian of the college 
to the classical languages. Seismic Observatory. 



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT, Mr. Myles J. 
Dolan, is a member of the Department of Com- 
merce and Finance. 




INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICS and chemistry and a 
member of the Athletic board is Mr. Louis Gachic. 



THE ONLY SCHOLASTIC currently on the faculty, DR. FRANCIS OZOG, Professor of Chemistry, is a 
Thomas Duggan, S.J., is an instructor in Sociology. seemingly inexhaustible source of information to 

upper division students. 



In the classroom this contact is achieved by means 
of questions and answers, quizzes, and discussions (and 
can seem, at times, uncomfortably personal!). 

Outside the classroom, there is a more informal, but 
no less important, contact. Each member of the faculty 
is the official advisor of a group of students and often an 
unofficial advisor to the rest of the school! 

"What courses should I sign up for next semester?" 
"Do you think I sould go into teaching?" 
"Father, my grades have been falling. What should 
I do?" 

These axe questions not to be taken lightly. 



Members of the faculty are called upon to moderate 
clubs, attend meetings, give speeches. They conduct 
classes which have to be heavily researched. Oc- 
casionally they have the unpleasant task of meting out 
punishments. Most of them have an office to say, Mass 
to celebrate, and various other spiritual duties to attend 
to. Yet, by magic, they always seem to be available. 

This is by no means limited to the Jesuit members 
of the faculty. The Order's schools are staffed, in large 
part, by laymen who are sympathetic to the aims of 
Jesuit education. Together with the priests, they form the 
faculy of the largest university in the world. 





ASSISTANT BASKETBALL COACH, Arthur Kalaher, is also coach of 
the Regis swimming team. 



DR. THEODORE ELLIOTT, who teaches embryology, is also a professor 
at the Colorado University medical school. 





EXPERT ON THE REFORMATION and French Revolution, the Rev. 
Harold L. Stansell, S.J., is head of the college's Social Sciences 
Department. 



COACH OF THE DEBATE TEAM, professor of speech and stock market 
expert is the Rev. Charles F. Kruger, S.J. 




A PERFECTIONIST, The Rev. George Tipton, S.J., MR. MICHAEL E. ENDRES teaches sociology, THE REV. FRED 
gives freshmen chemists a strong foundation for specializing in the field of criminology and cor- partment of Scii 
upper division work. rectional administration. and enthusiastic 



DALY, S.J., Chairmai 
;nce and Mathematics 
lecturer. 



i of the De- 
is a dynamic 




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AN INSTRUCTOR IN THE Spanish Language, Mr. Hector Franco is the 
son of a former Minister of Education in Mexico. 



HEAD BASKETBALL COACH and instructor in the Physical education de- 
partment Mr. Joseph B. Hall came to Regis from the University 
of Kentucky. 




MR. GEORGE E. BECHTOLT, associate 
professor of languages, is fluent in Ger- 
man, Chinese, French, Spanish, and 
Russian. 



UNCOMPROMISING AND exacting, the 
Rev. Edward Maginnis, S.J., has given 
the theology program new prestige. 








AN INSTRUCTOR IN the science of ac- 
counting, Mr. Rudy Sporcich prepares stu- 
dents for the business world. 





THE TRAINING OF fledgling teachers is 
the special task of Mr. John A. Flanagan, 
Assistant Professor of Psychology. 



AS DEPARTMENT HEAD, the Rev. Harry 
Klocker, S.J., brings a rare insight to the 
science of Philosophy. 



BROTHER JOHN J. RENK., S.J., is the 
college infirmarian, proprietor of the 
book store, a lepidopterist, and a 
jack-of-all-trades. 





i 







KNOWN FOR HIS LIVELY and instructive 
lectures, Mr. James Belton is an assistant 
professor of English. 



THE REV. THOMAS F. SINGLETON, S.J., 
a gentle but effective teacher, is Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics. 





THE REV. ELMER J. TRAME, S.J., Pro- 
fessor of Biology, counsels students, con- 
templating a career in medicine. 



A DISTINGUISHED Regis alumnus, the 
Most Rev. Bernard Sullivan, S.J., Titular 
Bishop of Halicarnassus, now teaches 
Spanish and Theology. 




A CHALLENGING TEACHER and accomplished scholar, the Rev. 
Christian L. Bonnet, S.J., holds a Ph.L. from the Gregorian University 
in Rome. 





COMING TO REGIS from the Colorado 
School of Mines, Mr. William S. Levings, 
is a professor of mathematics. 



SPECIALIZING IN THE 18th and 19th cen- 
turies, is the Rev. John F. Lyons, S.J., 
Associate Professor of English Literature. 





THE REV. RICHARD F. BOCKLAGE, S.J., 
is moderator of the RANGER and an 
instructor in the English department. 



AN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, the Rev. 
Mark S. Gross, S.J., has served in both 
the English and Theology departments. 





COMING TO REGIS FROM the U.S. Air Force Academy, Mr. Wallace 
Hoffman holds the position of assistant librarian. 







SPIRITUAL DIRECTOR, the Rev. Eugene 
Kelly, S.J., comes to the college from 
the Regis High School faculty. 



WELL KNOWN FOR HIS popular course 
in Dante's Inferno is English professor, 
the Rev. Louis Bloomer, S.J. 




THE REV. BERNARD KARST, S.J., is the 
Director of Residence Halls, a post he has 
held since 1930. 




IN ADDITION TO his duties as campus 
electrical engineer, the Rev. Henry Hecken, 
also teaches engineering drawing. 





THE REV. JAMES BOPP, S.J., an in- 
structor in English and speech, comes to 
Regis from the University of Detroit. 



MR. BERNARD W. SHEEHAN, an instructor 
in history, received his Master's degree 
from the University of Michigan. 





A look of disbelief and astonishment is mirrored in the face of Pat Gallagher who was chosen freshman "Most Humorous" as he accepts the trophy and 
congratulations from Student Senate President, Blair Farrell. 




The most important thinq in the life 



of the college student is, or should 



be, the acquiring of an education. 



There are students who accomplish 




this— and more. Their extra contri- 



butions to the college, their service 



their leadership deserve recognition. 



AWARDS 




WHO'S WHO 



Louis Doule 



An able administrator and tireless worker Lou Doyle 
has been active in student affairs since his freshman 
year at Regis. A major in economics, Lou has held 
offices in the Sodality, where he was secretary, and 
in Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity, where he was 
president. He has been a member of the St. John 
Berchman Society and has been a delegate to the 
Student Senate and to the new Inter-club Council. In 
addition to his duties as a broadcaster for KREG, Lou 
has been a staff writer for the Brown and Gold where 
his column "Bull Session" proved an astute and critical 
evaluation of the campus scene. 



Barrq Dawson 



J\n active leader in student affairs, Barry Dawson 
has proved himself a capable and energetic adminis- 
trator. Barry comes to the college from Regis High 
School. He is a business administration major and 
has acted as secretary to the Regis chapter of Circle 
K International and as vice-president to his junior 
class. A member of Alpha Kappa Psi business fra- 
ternity and the Denver Club, Barry also managed to 
hold down a part-time job while attending classes 
at the college. Barry received a bachelor of sci- 
ence degree. 




Blair Parrel) 

.Possessed of drive and a unique talent for organiza- 
tion, Student Senate Executive Board President Blair 
Farrell has guided that body through a particularly 
fruitful year. An English major from Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, Blair has acted as a conclave representative 
and during his junior year, held the office of president 
of his class. A member of the St. John Berchman So- 
ciety, radio station KREG, the Brown and Gold, the 
Drama Club and the Debate Club, Blair also served 
on the Awards Banquet Steering Committee. He has 
appeared on the Dean's List for all four of his years 
at Regis. 




Mike Klein 



l\ recipient of the Outstanding Service Award during 
his junior year, Mike Klein has always given Regis his 
time and abilities in many different capacities. Mike 
who is a business major from Lenexa, Kansas, was vice- 
president of his junior class and a director of the 
Student Senate Executive Board. He has served as 
photographer on the Brown and Gold and as Photog- 
raphy Editor of the Ranger during this past year. 
In addition, Mike was Secretary of the Ski Club and 
has held membership in the St. John Berchman Society 
and Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity. 




Terrq Welsh 

l\ major in business administration, Terry Welsh 
comes from Great Bend, Kansas. Terry has filled many 
important offices while at Regis. While a junior, he 
was treasurer of his class and, this year, served as 
treasurer of the Student Senate Executive Board. He 
was treasurer, then vice-president, finally president of 
Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity. Just as impressive is 
his record on the Ranger where he has been busi- 
ness manager, managing editor, and editor. Terrry has 
also served on the staff of the Brown and Gold and 
chairmaned the by-law Revision Committee of the 
Student Senate. 




Dave Sprehe 



Orderly, efficient, possessed of wry wit, Dave Sprehe 
is a capable administrator. While a junior, Dave was 
co-editor of the student newspaper, the Brown and 
Gold. As a senior, he has been a student prefect in 
Carroll Hall and secretary of the Student Senate Execu- 
tive Board. A member of the St. John Berchman 
Society, radio station KREG, the Literary Club, and a 
copy writer for the Ranger, Dave has consistently ap- 
peared on the Dean's List. Dave is an English major 
and comes from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 




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Mario Mapelli 



J\.nown for his affability, drive and efficiency, Mario 
Mapelli is a graduate of Regis High School in Denver. 
Making his major field economics, Mario has shown 
himself as an able scholar and has consistently main- 
tained over a B average. A four-year member of 
Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity, Mario has also 
held membership in the Italian Club and in the Denver 
Club and has freguently appeared on the Dean's List. 



George Coughlin 

Jxnown for his organizational ability and his cheerful- 
ness, George Coughlin has been a leader during all 
four of his years at Regis. After graduating from Regis 
High School, George entered the pre-medical program 
at the college. He has consistently appeared on the 
Dean's List, has been a member of the Glee Club 
and of the Circle K International. A director of the 
Student Senate Executive Board, George has also 
held offices in Rho Chi Sigma, where he was treasurer, 
and the Denver Club, where he was president during 
his junior year. He received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Chemistry and mathematics. 




Ben Cos'iml 



Jrre-med student Benedict Cosimi has been a con- 
sistent scholar. Ben has appeared on the Dean's List 
all eight semesters and, during his senior year, has 
been a director on the Student Senate Executive Board. 
While attending Regis College, Ben has held member- 
ship in Rho Chi Sigma, the Brown and Gold, and the 
Denver Club. He has been Sports Editor of the Ranger 
and President of the Aguinas Academy. Personable 
and efficient, Ben plans to become a doctor and will 
study medicine at the Colorado University Medical 
School. 




Dick Kellq 



J\ resident of Omaha, Nebraska, Dick Kelly is an 
English major. An unassuming but capable student 
leader, Dick served as student prefect in O'Connell 
Hall and as a member of the Awards Banguet Steering 
Committee. He has contributed his efforts to the So- 
dality, the Glee Club, the St. John Berchman Society, 
the Brown and Gold, the Drama Club and the National 
Education Association. His membership has proved a 
valuable asset to these organizations and to the 
school in general. 



Bill VA/helan 



f\ guietly efficient administrator, Bill Whelan has 
contributed his time and energy unstintingly to student 
affairs at Regis. Bill has been vice-president of the 
Student Senate Executive Board and as a member of 
that group which worked closely with the Placement 
Office as student coordinator. He has played varsity 
baseball and is a member of the R Club. Among the 
other organizations of which he is a member are the 
Sodality, the Glee Club, the Denver Club and Alpha 
Kappa Psi fraternity. A major in economics, Bill comes 
to the college from across the campus at Regis High 
School. 




GLEASON 

MEMORIAL 

AWARD 



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GLEASON AWARD 



DENNIS 
BOONE 



1 he winner of this year's John E. Gleason Award is 
basketball star Dennis Boone. 

The award which Boone receives is given each 
year by the brothers of Alpha Delta Gamma Fraternity 
in recognition of prowess in athletics and is dedicated 
to the memory of the late John E. Gleason, Regis 
basketball star killed in an automobile accident while 
still a student. 

Coming to Regis from Manual High School in Den- 
ver, Dennis Boone has mounted an impressive scoring 
record, maintaining an average of 20.5 points per 
game. A deadly marksman, his spirit and leadership 
have earned for him the John E. Gleason Memorial 
Award for 1959-1960. 



REGIS COLLEGE; MEN OF THE YEAR 





QEORGE COUQHLIN 




KENNETH JOULE 




DAVID 5PREHE 



Ulm I 




ANDREW KLEIN 




BENEDICT COSIMI 




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ROBERT PIPKIN 




BLAIR FARRELL 



JOHN FOLEY 




OUTSTANDING SCHOLAR 




BENEDICT COSIMI 



CHEMISTRY AWARDS 



OUTSTANDING SENIOR CHEMIST 
Mike Burke 





OUTSTANDING FRESHMAN CHEMIST 
Pat Eicker 



ALUMNI AWARDS 



Paul J. Toner 
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT 





John P. Akolt 
OUTSTANDING SERVICE 



Alfred E. O'Meava 
HONORARY RANGER 




DEBATE HONORS 




DEBATORS: Paul Fairchild, Pat Cudmore, Paul Horan, Jerry Doherty, Allen Gerstner, Thomas Scaglia. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT AWARD 

Joseph Burke 






$ 




NTRAMURAL AWARDS 








\1 

Paul Dugan BASKETBALL 




Dallas Plese FOOTBALL 



PLAYHOUSE SERVICE AWARD 




Dave Eb^ 



FRESHMEN AWARDS 




OUTSTANDING FRESHMEN 
Ed Coughlln 



JflBB?S|| 



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m 



MOST SPIRITED 
Tom Welsh 



QLUTTON FOR PUNISHMENT 
Phil Archibeck 




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MOST HUMOROUS 
Pat Gallagher 




Break time finds Regis students pouring „„, of Loyola Hall and dashing over to the Student Center for a smoke, coffee, and bull session with fellow cohorts. 








M/ith their scholastic careers dravA/ing 



sharplq to a close, Regis seniors an- 



ticipate graduation u/ith mixed 



emotions: regret for what theu will 



leave behind, but also hope and 



confidence for the future. 



The carefree underclassmen studif 



and hope that theif, too, mau, some- 



dau, be rewarded for their efforts 



bu, being able to join the ranks of 



the Regis alumni. 



CLASSES 






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Lou Caricato, Treasurer; William Meiers, Student Senate alternate; Dave Rottino, President; Mike Burke, Secretary; Don Cordova, Vice President. 



SENIORS 



CLASS OF 1960 



ALLEN, GEORGE T. 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

B.S., Business Administration 



ARVIDSON, JAMES E. 
Keokuk, Iowa 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Student 
Prefect. 



BAILEY, JACK N. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Mathematics 
Dean's List; Freshman Basket- 
ball; Varsity Basketball. 



BLICK, KENNETH W. 
Roggen, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List; Varsity Baseball; 
Sodality; Band; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; R Club. 




BOATRIGHT, JAMES F. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



BRADY, WILLIAM M. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Mathematics 



BURKE, MICHAEL F. 

Albuquerque, N.M. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma, President; 

Senior Class, Secretary. 



CARICATO, LOUIS A. 
Pueblo, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



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CASSIDY, MICHAEL D. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

B.S., Chemistry 
Dean's List; Varsity Baseball; 
Sodality; Rho Chi Sigma; St. 
John Berchman Society. 



CLOUTMAN, ANTHONY J. 
Salem, Mass. 

B.S., Mathematics 

Dean's List; Brown and Gold; 

Sophomore Class, President. 



COMPTON, STEPHEN J. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Circle 
International. 



COSIMI, BENEDICT A. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 
Dean's List; Student Senate, 
Director; Rho Chi Sigma; Ski 
Club; Brown and Gold; 
Ranger, Sports Ed.; Aquinas 
Academy, President; Denver 
Club; Who's Who. 




COLEMAN, KEITH E. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 



CORDOVA, DONALD E. 
Trinidad, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Varsity Baseball; 
Alpha Delta Gamma, Sgt.-at- 
Arms; St. John Berchman Socie- 
ty; Brown and Gold. 



CULLAN, THOMAS R. 
Hemingford, Nebr. 

B.S., English 

St. John Berchman Society; 

Irish Regis Association, Sgt.- 

at-Arms. 



COUGHLIN, GEORGE F. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry and Biology 
Dean's List; Student Senate 
Director; Glee Club; Treas- 
urer, Rho Chi Sigma; Circle 
K International; Irish Regis 
Association; Denver Club, 
President; Who's Who. 




DEASY, JOHN F. 
New York City, N.Y. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Brown and Gold; 
Sociology Club; Veteran's 
Club; Literary Club, Secre- 
tary. 



DOOHER, TERRENCE E. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Mathematics 

Dean's List; Aquinas Academy; 

Denver Club; Irish - Regis 

Association. 




EBY, DAVID H. 
Denver, Colo. 

I B.S., Biology 
Dean's List; Denver Club, 
Vice-President; Rho Chi Sig- 
ma; Treasurer, Freshman 

! Class; Day Student Conclave 
Representative; Drama Club. 



ETZKORN, ROBERT L 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 
Denver Club. 



Psi 



DAWSON, BARRY T. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi, Vice- 
President; Circle K; Junior 
Class, Vice-President; Den- 
ver Club; Who's Who; 
Sophomore Class, Vice- 
President. 



DOYLE, LOUIS V. 
Pueblo, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 
Treasurer, Sodality; Presi- 
dent, Alpha Kappa Psi; St. 
John Berchman Society; 
Treasurer, Junior Class; 
Brown and Gold; Who's 
Who. 



DUNCAN BERNARD J. 
Glenrock, Wyo. 

B.S., Sociologv 
KREG. 



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ESQUIBEL, BELARMINO 
Tierra Amarilla, N.M. 

B.S., History 

Sodality; Brown and Gold; 

NEA. 





EYRE, RICHARD C. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 




FREI, A. E. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 
Denver Club. 



FRENCHMORE, 
RAYMOND 

Trinidad, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Alpha Delta Gamma. 



GREGORY, WILLIAM C. 
Climax, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 
Sociology Club. 




FARRELL, BLAIR K. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Conclave Representa- 
tive; President, Student Senate; 
President, Junior Class; St. John 
Berchman Society; KREG Station 
Manager; Brown and Gold, Fea- 
ture Editor; Drama Club; Debate 
Club; Who's Who; Outstanding 
Leadership Award. 



FOTI, THEODORE J. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Alpha Delta Gamma, Vice- 
President; Brown and Gold; 
Banger, Advertising Manager; 
Aquinas Academv. 




GAHL, JAMES F. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

B.S., Chemistry 

IX'an's List; Rho Chi Sigma 

John Berchman Society. 



GILLEN, DENNIS G. 
Greeley, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma, Sodality. 




GUYER, JAMES B. 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Glee Club; Stu- 
dent Prefect; NSA Student 
Representative. 



HALL, DONALD J. 
Rawlins, Wyo. 

B.S., Sociology 
KREG; Sociology Club. 







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HILMER, RICHARD 


HUDSON, ANDREW K. 


! Brookfield, Wis. 


Denver, Colo. 



B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Band; Rho 

Sigma; KREG. 



B.S., Mathematics 
Chi Alpha Delta Gamma; KREG; 
Brown and Gold; Denver Club. 



HAUSHALTER, JERRY L. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

B.S., Accounting 
Dean's List; Freshman Bas- 
ketball; Varsity Basketball; 
Alpha Delta Gamma, Sgt- 
at-Arms. 



JARAMILLO, JOHN F. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., English 

NEA; Aquinas Academy. 



JIRON, DANIEL G. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 





JOHNSON, PAUL A. 
Denver, Colo. 



B.S., English 
Dean's List; 
Club. 



NEA; Italian 



KELLY, RICHARD E. 
Omaha, Nebr. 

B.S., English 

Sociality; Glee Club; St. John 
Berchman Society; Broivn and 
Gold; Student Prefect; Drama 
Club; NEA; Who's Who. 



KLEIN, MICHAEL A. 

Lenexa, Kans. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Sodality; Ski Club, Secretary; 
Who's Who; Director, Student 
Senate; Brown and Gold; Bang- 
er, Photography Editor; Vice- 
President, Junior Class; St. John 
Berchmann Society; Alpha Delta 
Gamma; Outstanding Service 
Award. 



LEON-GUERRERO, JOSE 

Agana, Guam 

B.S., History 

KREG; Alpha Delta Gamma; 

Broivn and Gold. 




MAGGIO, FRANK P. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Ski Club; Alpha Delta Gam- 
ma, Secretary, Pledgemaster; 
Broivn and Gold; Aquinas 
Academy, Secretary; Presi- 
dent, Freshman Class; St. 
Thomas More Club, Secretary. 



MAPELLI, MARIO J. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 

Dean's List; Who's Who; Alpha 

Kappa Psi; Italian Club; Denver 

Club. 



MARCOTTE, HAROLD D. 
Salina, Kans. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Freshman Basketball; Varsity 
Basketball; Alpha Delta Gamma; 
R Club; St. John Berchman 
Societv. 



MARVEL, WILLIAM M. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.A., English 

Dean's List; Day Student 
Conclave Representative; 
Broivn and Gold, Feature 
Editor; Ranger, Assistant Edi- 
tor; Aquinas Academy; De- 
bate Club; Denver Club, 
Vice-President; Literary Club, 
President. 



McCUE, MICHAEL A. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

B.S., English 

Alpha Delta Gamma, Histori- 
an, Vice-President; Ski Club, 
President; Tennis Team; 
Ranger, Advertising Manager. 



MEIERS, WILLIAM H. 
Arkansas City, Kans. 

B.S., Accounting 

Freshman Basketball; Varsity Bas- 
ketball; Alpha Kappa Psi, Treas- 
urer; Senior Class, Student Senate 
Alternate. 




MUELLER, GENE LEE 
New Baden, 111. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Freshman Basketball; Sodali- 
ty; Band; Glee Club; Alpha 
Kappa Psi. 



OBST, JAMES E. 
Dallas, Texas 

B.S., Economics 

Dean's List; Golf Team; Alpha 
Delta Gamma, Pledgemaster, 
Steward, Historian; Ski Club; R. 
Club; Brown and Gold; St. John 
Berchman Society. 




McCORMICK, JAMES C. 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappi 

Psi. 




MEISEL, J. KEITH 
Rock Falls, 111. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Alpha Delta 
Gamma; Ski Club; NEA; 
History Club; St. John 
Berchman Society; Student 
Senate Alternate, Junior 
Class; Ranger, Class Editor. 




MEYER, RAYMOND F. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Alpha Delta 

Gamma, Secretary; Ranger, 

Advertising Manager; R 

Club; NEA; Golf Team, 

Captain. 




O'CONNOR, JAMES F. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 





ORTNER, JOHN R. 

Holyoke, Colo. 

B.S., Psychology and History 
Vice-Prefect, Sodality; Band; 
St. John Berchman Society; 
NEA; Denver Club. 



PARISI, TOM J. 
Denver. Colo. 

B.S., Psychology 

Dean's List; Freshman Basket- 
ball; NEA; Italian Club. 



ROATCH, LLOYD H. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 



ROBINSON, JOHN A. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Ski Club; Circle K Interna- 
tional; Denver Club; Sociolo- 
gy Club. 




ROHLF1NG, DERRICK 
Grand Junction, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma; Bowling 

Team. 



ROTTINO, DAVID A. 
New York City, N.Y. 

B.S., Mathematics 
Ski Club; Ranger; Boarder Con- 
clave Representative; President, 
Senior Class. 



SCHIPPERS, JOHN T. 

Albuquerque, N.M. 

B.S., Sociology 

Dean's List; Sodality; Debate 

Club; Sociology Club, President. 



SANCHEZ, LEO R. 
Casper, Wyo. 

B.S., History 



SMITH, VINCENT LEO 
Fairplay, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Sodality; St. John 
Berchman Society; KREG; 
NEA; St. Thomas More. 



SPREHE, DAVID LOUIS 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Secretary, Student 
Senate; Editor, Brown and Gold; 
Who's Who; Student Prefect; 
Athletic Board. 



STEIN, ROBERT L. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List. 



SWANSON, BOBERT J. 
Chicago, 111. 

B.S., Economics 
Secretary, Sodality. 




SWIRCZYNSKI, WALTER J. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



TAFOYA, ROBERT E. 
Trinidad, Colo. 



B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List. 



TELATNIK, STEPHEN C. 
Avon Lake, Ohio 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Sodality; Band; Rho 

Chi Sigma; Brown and Gold. 



WALROND, JEROME R. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Missouri Club. 



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WELSH, TERRENCE P. 
Great Bend, Kans. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Treasurer, Student Senate; 
Who's Who; Alpha Delta 
Gamma, Treasurer and Vice- 
President; Brown and Gold; 
Ranger, Business Manager, 
Managing Editor, Editor; 
Junior Class, Treasurer; Presi- 
dent, Alpha Delta Gamma; 
Outstanding Leadership 
Award. 



WETZEL, JAMES M. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Vice-President, 
Sophomore Class; Freshman 
Basketball; Varsity Baseball; So- 
dality; Glee Club; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; R Club. 



WHELAN, WILLIAM J. 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean's List; Who's Who; Vice- 
President, Student Senate; Varsi- 
ty Baseball; Sodality; Glee Club; 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Denver Club; 
Sophomore Class, Student Coun- 
cil Alternate. 



WILLIAMS, JOHN L. 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 

Dean's List; Sociology Club 




THOMAS C. CONNOLLY 

1937 1959 

Requiescat in Pace 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS— Fronf Row: John Foley, President. Second Row: Chris O'Donnell, Vice President; Jim Waters, Treasurer; Dennis Gallagher, Secretary; Dar 
Otero, Student Senate Alternate. 



JUNIORS 



CLASS OF 1961 




B. BURNS 
Lakewood, Colo. 



J. BUSTOS 
Denver, Colo. 



J. CABELA 
Chopped, Nebr 



J. CLARK 
Wichita, Kan. 



E. CLINTON 


R. CONNELLY 


R. DISTEL 


J. DOHERTY 


P. DUGAN 


D. EGGER 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Silverton, Colo. 


Chicago, III. 


Wichita, Kan. 


Denver, Colo 



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J. FOLEY 
Wichita, Kan. 



G. FOURET 
Denver, Colo. 



C. FRANK 
Denver, Colo. 



D. GALLAGHER 
Denver, Colo. 



R. GAPPA 
Winona, Minn. 



J. GEARY H. GISLER 

Leadville, Colo. Denver, Colo. 



J. GODFREY 
Tulsa, Okla. 



J. GOTTSCHALK 
Garden City, Kan. 




1 



9 



6 



1 




T. HARMER 
Rockford, III. 



R. HEIL C. HIBBISON 

Richmond Heights, Mo. Short Hills, N.J. 



"Use Wild-Root Cream Oil, Charlie 



The picture on the cover of Di- 
anna Barrymore's book, Too 
'So your papa owns Woolworths — Hmmmmmm." Much Too Soon. 





C. JOHNSON 
Denver, Colo. 



R. HORAN 
Denver, Colo. 



W. HOUSTON 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



H. HUMPHREYS 
Denver, Colo. 



L. HUPPERT 
Okmulgee, Okla. 



T. HITZELBERGER 
Chicago, III. 




K. JOULE 


R. KING 


J. KOSEDNAR 


L. KOSEDNAR 


P. KOSMICKI 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


Laramie, Wyo. 


West Allis, Wise. 


West Allis, Wise. 


Alliance, Nebr. 




R. LENNON 
Sioux City, Iowa 



T. LINNEBUR 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



G. LONG 
Denver, Colo. 



G. LUCHETTA 
Denver, Colo. 



J. McCOY 
Milwaukee, Wise. 



L. McGEE 
Riffle, Colo. 



p. Mclaughlin 

Denver, Colo. 





B. MARRIN 
Denver, Colo. 



M. MAYER 
Kansas City, Mo. 



G. MILLER 
Palisades Park, N.J. 



J. MORRISON 
Hartland, Wis. 



D. NORTON 
Denver, Colo. 



C. O'DONNELL 
Detroit, Mich. 




P. O'NEILL 
St. Paul, Minn. 



D. OTERO 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



D. PACHECO 
Denver, Colo. 



T. PAULBECK 
Elm Grove, Wis. 



R. PIPKIN 
Denver, Colo. 




W. QUINN 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



J. RAUEN 
Kenosha, Wi 



M. REINECKE 
Denver, Colo. 



D. REINPOLD 
Denver, Colo. 



M. ROBLEE 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



'In the fourth at Santa Anita, it looks like 



"Say that again 
a thousand ships." 



about my face launching a 



Jimmy Martinez arrives in Wash- 
ington to testify before the Sen- 
ate Sub-committee. 




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J. RYAN 


M. SARGENT 


T. SCAGLIA 


T. SCHNEIDER 


J. SCHROPFER 


R. SCHWARTZ 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Wauwatosa, Wis. 


Holyoke, Colo. 


Harrington, Nebr 




1 



9 



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D. STARBUCK 
Brighton, Colo. 



T. STEWART 
Denver, Colo. 




J. TARABINO 
Trinidad, Colo. 



J. TAYLOR 
Milwaukee, Wr 



M. TEMAAT 
Denver, Colo. 



T. TRACY 

Grosse Pointe, Mich. 



R. VESCOVO 


J. WATERS 


M. WELLS 


K. WILLIAMS 


J. YAX 


A. ZARLENGO 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Los Alamos, N.M. 


Charleston, W. Va. 


Lincoln, Nebr. 


Denver, Colo. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS— Dave Cullan, Treasurer; Fred Albi, Vice President; Vince Bocklage, President; Bill Cochran, Secretary; Dan Hoskins, Student Sen- 
ate Alternate. 



SOPHOMORES 



CLASS OF 1962 





D. ALDERS 
Denver, Colo. 



1 



H. MIRE 
Denver, Colo. 



9 



6 



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J. AVILA 
Denver, Colo. 



D. BAILEY 
Denver, Colo. 



P. BEAUVAIS 
Pueblo, Colo. 



J. BENNETT 
Denver, Colo. 




J. BERG 
Bridgeport, Nebr 



R. BERNSTEIN 
Chicago, III. 



D. BESHOAR 
Denver, Colo. 



F. BISCHOFBERGER 
Denver, Colo. 



V. BOCKLAGE 


C. BROWN 


W. BUCKLEY 


C. BUDINGER 


J. BURKE 


R. CHEENEY 


Normandy, Mo. 


Chicago, III. 


Midland, Texas 


Springfield, III. 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


Wolf Point, Mont 



J. CHOJNACKI 


R. CHRISTENSEN 


W. COCHRAN 


J. COLLINS 


J. CONNERS 


T. CONSTANTINE 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Denver, Colo. 


Normandy, Mo. 


Chicago, III. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 



R. COOK 
Rifle, Colo. 



T. COPPS 

Stevens Point, Wis. 



P. CRONIN 
Denver, Colo. 



D. CULLAN 
Hemingford, Nebr 




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R. DAUGHERTY 
Denver, Colo. 



G. DeMARLIE 
Moline, III. 



B. DINGMAN 
Houghton, Iowa 



C. DOMAN 

Grand Island, Nebr 



See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. 



Eleanor Roosevelt is greeted by India's unwashed "When I grow up . . ." 

masses. 




P. DOWD 

Grand Island, Nebr 




T. DOWNING 
Denver, Colo. 



R. EATON 

Wheat Ridge, Colo. 



D. ELDREDGE 
Hudson, Wis. 



D. ELLIS 
Denver, Colo. 



Q. ERTEL 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



J. FABAC J. FIGGE 

Colorado Springs, Colo. Davenport, Iowa 



W. FIGURNIAK 
Phoenix, Ariz. 



M. FLAHERTY 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




1 



9 



6 



2 




W. FLETCHER 
Hominy, Okla. 



P. FREY 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



D. FRUEN 

St. Paul, Minn. 



J. GALLAGHER 
Denver, Colo. 



J. GEERDES W. GRAEFE 

Hoxie, Kan. Des Moines, Iowa 



W. GREITEN 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 



J. HARTMAN 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



G. HASENKAMP 
Denver, Colo. 



E. HEEREN 
Denver, Colo. 




D. HIRSCH 
Denver, Colo. 



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R. HOOGERWERF 
III. 



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D. HOSKINS 
Denver, Colo. 



P. HUGHES 
Kansas City, Mo. 



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B. JAMES 

South Sioux City, Nebr 



C. JENKINS 
Denver, Colo. 



J. JONES 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



D. KELLY 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



R. KELLY 
Boonton, N.J. 





T. MALLEY 
Kansas City, Mo. 



R. MARTIN 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



g. McCarthy 


j. McCarthy 


T. McCORMICK 


W. McCURDY 


D. McDANIEL 


T. McGEE 


Pueblo, Colo. 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Denver, Colo. 


Pewaukee, Wis. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Denver, Colo 




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J. McMAHAN 


D. McNELIS 


d. McNeill 




J. METZ 


R. MILBERT 


P. MOORE 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Huntington Sta. 


N.Y. 


Denver, Colo. 


Dyersville, Iowa 


Denver, Colo 



62 




J. MORAN 
Lamar, Colo. 



R. MOSCHEL 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



J. MUCKENTHALER 
Denver, Colo. 



R. MULLANEY 
Winnetka, III. 




J. MURA 
Kansas City, Mo. 



L. NAU 
Munster, Ind. 



R. NUSSE 
Denver, Colo. 



Songs their Mothers taught them. 



Father Murray's boyhood room. 



". . . and after my next picture 
we plan to retire." 





B. CLEAR 


R. OSTBERG 


R. O'DONNELL 


R. O'CONNELL 


R. O'KEEFE 


R. OCHS 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Albany, N. Y. 


Denver, Colo. 


Chicago, III. 


Denver, Colo. 




19 



P. O'NEAL 
St. Louis, Mo. 



L. PATTERSON 
Morrison, Colo. 



R. PATTON 
Arlington Heights, III. 



J. PAXTON 
Denver, Colo. 




M. PERRY 
Detroit, Mich. 



G. PETERS 
Greendale, Wise. 



J. PETO 
Denver, Colo. 



R. PFEFFLE 
St. Louis, Mo. 



T. PINO 


R. PITTELKOW 


G. RAEL 


W. REAGAN 


F. REICHERT 


G. REID 


Denver, Colo. 


Wauwatosa, Wis. 


Brighton, Colo. 


Estes Park, Colo. 


Seldon, Kansas 


Denver, Colo. 




J. RHOADES 


D. RICKEN 


T. RIUAHAN 


C. ROITZ 


R. ROTH 


P. RYAN 


Denver, Colo. 


Dyersville, Iowa 


Worland, Wyo. 


Trinidad, Colo. 


Goodland, Kansas 


Appleton, Wis 




S. SCIORTINO 
Pueblo, Colo. 



C. SCHMITT 
Denver, Colo. 



R. SCHREIBER J. SHERMAN 

Colorado Springs, Colo. Hastings, Nebraska 



'My God, I left the baby in the bathtub.' 



'A horse! a horse!, my kingdom for a horse! 



V 





1 



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J. TELLEZ 
Greely, Colo. 



G. THEISEN 
Sugar Grove, III. 




D. THILL 
Anaheim, Calif. 



J. THORSEN 
Phoenix, Arizona 



G. TWINING 
Littleton, Colo. 



L. VIFQUIN 
Denver, Colo. 



G. WADE 


R. WALLNER 


C. WAMSER 


W. WETHINGTON 


J. WIESNER 


G. YUMICH 


Memphis, Tenn. 


Wauwatosa, Wis. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Boulder, Colo. 


Denver, Colo 





FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS— Front Row: Dave Yezzi, President. Back Row: Tim Campion, Secretary; Tom Welsh, Treasurer; Dan Dalpes, Student Senate Alternate; 
Fred Martin, Vice-president. 



FRESHMEN 



CLASS OF 1963 



M. AMMAN 


R. ARCHER 


P. ARCHIBECK 


J. ARCHULETA 


G. ARNDORFER 


P. BACKUS 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Albuquerque, N. M. 


Denver, Colo. 


Wauwatosa, Wise. 


Denver, Colo. 




1 



9 



6 



3 



K. BEARDSLEY 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



J. BECKER 
Milwaukee, Wise. 




L. BEIRICH 
Denver, Colo. 



F. BEISER 
McAllen, Texas 



W. BELL 
Denver, Colo. 



L. BINTNER 
Denver, Colo. 



C. BOCOCK 


P. BORER 


J. BORMAN 


R. BOWLES 


R. BRADY 


T. BRAND 


Del Norte, Colo. 


Manitowoc, Wise. 


Gordon, Nebr. 


Peoria, III. 


Denver, Colo. 


Berwyn, III 




D. BRUNO 
Denver, Colo. 



T. CAMPION 
Albany, N. Y. 



M. CARELLI 
Oak Park, III. 



J. CHARPENTIER 
Jacksonville Beach, Fla. 



J. CISLAGHI 
Santa Fe, N. M. 




1 



9 



3 



J. COMETTO 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



J. CONLIN 
Cascade, Iowa 




D. CONNOLLY 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 



M. COSTIGAN 
Milwaukee, Wise. 



E. COUGHLIN 
Denver, Colo. 



'Just whaddaya mean by saying that I have bad breath?" 



"Wait'll I get the guy who told me this place was 
small, intimate, and quiet!" 



"Listen! If you'd let me get two 
words in edgewise maybe I 
WOULD talk to you." 



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P. CUDMORE 


D. DALPES 


D. J. DALPES 


J. DEMPSEY 


C. DES MOINEAUX 


D. R. DEVEREAUX 


Denver, Colo. 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Phoeniz, Ariz. 


Oshkosh, Wis. 


Denver, Colo. 


St. Louis, Mo. 



J. DOHERTY T. DONOVAN 

Albuquerque, N.M. Denver, Colo. 




1 



9 



6 



3 



G. DOOHER 
Denver, Colo. 




M. DOYLE 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



M. EDWARDS 
Chicago, III. 



T. EICHINGER 
St. Paul, Minn. 



P. EICKER 
Denver, Colo. 



F. ELKINS 


M. EWERS 


P. FAIRCHILD 


P. FARLEY 


R. FEELY 


E. FEULNER 


Denver, Colo. 


Warsaw, III. 


Shawnee, Okla. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Elmhurst, III. 




gggp 





D. FIEGEL 


L. FINKEN 


L. C. FINKEN 


A. FINNERTY 


J. FISHER 


T. FITZGERALD 


Dighton, Kan. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


San Mateo, Calif. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


Denver, Colo. 



T. FITZGERALD 
Alliance, Nebr. 



C. FIX 
Columbus, Nebr. 



M. FLYNN 
Chicago, III. 



S. FRENCH 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




1 



9 



6 



3 




A. GADBOIS 
Boulder, Colo. 



E. GALLAGHER 
O'Neill, Nebr. 



P. GALLAGHER 
Hartford, Conn. 



E. GALLIPEAU 
Kirkwood, Mo. 



'If my old man could see me now he'd flip!' 



This picture makes that old adage, about crime not Twenty-two Skiddo! Cat's Meow! 

paying, sure seem kind of silly, huh? Oh you Kid! 




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J. GARLAND 


J. GASCOYNE 


R. GATTAS 


J. GERLOCH 


D. GESSLER 


L. GILL 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


Wichita, Kan. 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 




1 



9 



3 



V. GRABIAN 
Evergreen, Colo. 



J. GREITEN 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




J. GUETTLER 
Denver, Colo. 



J. HACKETT 
Chicago, III. 



M. HAFFEY 
Denver, Colo. 



C. HAMM 


D. HANNEGAN 


J. HARDING 


G. HARRINGTON 


J. HAUGAN 


T. HAUGAN 


Englewood, Colo. 


Lynnfield, Mass. 


Woodstock, III. 


Tulsa, Okla. 


Sidney, Nebr. 


Sidney, Nebr. 




R. HEIDENREICH 
Denver, Colo. 


T. HENDRICKSON 
Minneapolis, Minn. 


J. HERNANDEZ 
Albuquerque, N.M. 


J. HERZOG 
St. Louis, Mo. 


J. HESSION 
Denver, Colo. 


T. HOPKINS 
Chicago, III. 


T. HORAN 
FayeHeville, Ark. 


S. HREN 
Denver, Colo. 






J. HRMIGO 
Denver, Colo. 


D. HUBBES 
Salina, Kan. 




1 



9 



6 



3 







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W. JEFFREY 
El Reno, Okla. 



G. JOHNSON 
Denver, Colo. 



"Really Tom! Don't you think you're carrying this "Arabi- "When you're a gambling man you always have to "This strange feeling of appre- 

an Nights" thing too far?" take what you get." hension creeps over me every 

time I agree to a Heights' blind 




S. JOHNSON 


J. JONES 


D. KAMMER 


J. KIDWELL 


D. KIEFER 


T. KIMSEY 


Denver, Colo. 


Shepherdsville, Ky. 


Denver, Colo. 


Sioux City, Iowa 


Grand Junction, Colo. 


Kansas City, Mo 




1 



9 



6 



3 



G. KRUSE 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 




D. LAMBOTT 
Thornton, Colo. 



D. LAWLER 
Kansas City, Mo. 



G. LEONE 
Trinidad, Colo. 



J. LOWRY 
Houston, Texas 



R. LUMPP 


J. MALONEY 


E. MANN 


B. MAGUIRE 


E. MARKO 


F. MARTIN 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Wilmette, III. 


Denver, Colo. 


Cheyenne, Wyo. 


Denver, Colo 




■I 



^ 



K. MASSEY 


F. MAURO 


E. McCABE 


s. McCarthy 


T. McCUE 


M. McGUIRE 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Denver, Colo. 


Albuquerque, N.M. 


Glencoe, III. 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Neola, Iowa 



l Mcdonough 

Wichita, Kan. 



L. MELENDEZ 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



D. MILDENBERGER 
Sterling, Colo. 



G. MONTERA 
Denver, Colo. 




1 



9 



6 



3 




J. MURPHY 

Grosse Pointe, Mich. 



F. MURPHY 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Young children frolic on spacious, cool lawns at the local The Shah and his new queen, Farah Diba, drink a toast Audrey Hepburn arrives at Hol- 

home for the mentally handicapped. —for what I wonder? lywood's Pantages Theatre to re- 

ceive her award. 




R. MURRAY R. NAWROCKI 

Port Washington, N.Y. St. Louis, Mo. 



J. O'CONNELL 
Wellesley, Mass. 




1 



J. O'CONNOR 
Denver, Colo. 



9 



6 



J. PADILLA 
Denver, Colo. 



D. PLESE 
Pueblo, Colo, 



M. PEDDECORD 
Wichita, Kan. 



G. POLIDORI 
Denver, Colo. 



G. POTTER 
Denver, Colo. 




M. REGAN T. REYNOLDS 

Garden City, Kan. Milwaukee, Wis. 



L. RICE 
Roslyn, N.Y. 



J. ROACH 
Baraboo, Wis. 



P. ROHAN 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 




M. ROSS 


R. RUDOLPH 


J. RUPPERT 


W. SAGARA 


E. SAHILL 


M. SAURER 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Artesia, N.M. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 



R. SCARSELLI 
Raton, N.M. 



B. SCHLKIN 
Denver, Colo. 




1 



9 



6 



3 



P. SCHMITZ 
Chicago, III. 



J. SCHMIT 
Columbus, Nebr. 




W. SCHMITZ 
Kenosha, Wis. 



R. SCHOENEBECK 
Belleville, III. 



H. SCHREIVOGEL 
Kit Carson, Colo. 



G. SHOEMAKER 
Denver, Colo. 



Being attentive and alert is a characteristic 
Regis men. 



common to all A recent meeting of Underworld Incorporated. 



"Got 'em in Switzerland, but for 
you my friend— just $20 Ameri- 
can and they are yours." 




R. SIMON 


R. SPINUZZI 


T. STANLEY 


L. STOUT 


R. STRAW 


D. SULLIVAN 


North Platte, Nebr. 


Pueblo, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Cynthianna, Ky. 


Denver, Colo. 


Milwaukee, Wis. 




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T. K. TSUMURA 


J. L. TUJAGUE 


D. L. VALDEZ 


J. M. VINCENT 


J. A. WALGREEN 


G. H. WALLERIUS 


Denver, Colo. 


Metairie, La. 


Denver, Colo. 


Denver, Colo. 


Winnetka, III. 


Salina, Kan. 



J. P. WALSH 
Denver, Colo. 



L. L. WANSER 
O'Neill, Nebr. 



J. W. WARNER 
Keokuk, Iowa 



T. J. WELSH 
Great Bend, Kan. 



E. J. WERTH 
Denver, Colo. 





R. D. WICKENHAUSER 
Denver, Colo. 



W. R. WINKS 
Glencoe, III. 



T. J. YAX 
Lincoln, Nebr 



C. D. YEZZI 
Albany, N.Y. 



"I merely answered her questions as to whether I would 
like April in Paris, children, a one or two story house— 
and now this!" 



"Let's face reality Helen . . . you'll never get a divorce." 



What's that old line about the 
world being a stage and the 
people in it actors and actresses? 




Proms, picnics, politics, parties, 



programs and performances best 



summarize all that is fine and memor- 



rable of our college career. It 



these things which will be brought 



up discussed, and reminisced oyer, 



again and aga'tn, in future qears for 



this is college life- 



should be. 



COLLEGE LIFE 



DENVER 



rlegis is often advertised as being "On the crest of 
the west." Actually, it is located in Denver, some 60 
miles west of the true "Crest of the West," the Con- 
tinental Divide. 

Denver is close enough to the mountains, how- 
ever, to give Regis students walking across the cam- 
pus a good look at them. And on weekends, skiing is 
a scant hour's drive away. 

The city itself is a young city with a brand-new 
skyline. To be seen at its best, it should be seen at 
night. From a street in the downtown area, it is a 
garden of bright neon signs — the Exodus, the Center 
Theatre, the Outrigger Room. From its outskirts, the 
city is a treasure of brilliant jewels cast up against 
the base of the mountains and scattered across the 
black velvet plains. 



A noonday sun illuminates and draws 
forth a special quality of 
beauty that is not witnessed at 
Denver's Capitol Building in any other time 
of the day. 














Raising its proud, glittery head above the exciting hustle and bustle of Denver's evening traffic, the mar 
quee of the Centre theatre stands as a gleaming sentinel against the Denver skyline. 



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An aerial view of metropolitan Denver, with the magnificent Rocky Mountains as a backdrop, shows this 
modern "Utopia of the West" to its best advantage. 




A winter landscape enhances and magnifies the majestic beauty of old Main Hall. The functional purpose of this building is to provide administration facilities 
for the college and living quarters for the Jesuit fathers. 



CAMPUS 



Oampus landmarks are prominent in the mind 
of every Regis student. Most conspicuous on 
the Regis Campus is the venerable old Main 
Hall which has served the college since its 
founding over seventy years ago. The chapel, 
one of the most important buildings on the 
campus, acts as the center of religious activity 
for Regis. The two dorms, O'Connell and Car- 
roll Halls are typical of the architectural con- 
trasts which mark the Regis campus. De Smet 
Hall, a "temporary" building which has be- 
come a permanent butt of Regis jokes, is the 
focal point of Regis student government and 
extra-curricular activities. A new addition to 
the Regis campus, the Fieldhouse, is an im- 
posing structure which promises to become 
a popular site for Regis students. Loyola Hall, 
the main classroom building, serves as the cen- 
ter of intellectual pursuit at Regis. 




De Smet Hall, a landmark on the Regis College campus, provides office space for 
student government, various college clubs and organizations, and for the many 
faculty department heads. 



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Most all of the Regis stu- 
dents' classroom hours are 
spent behind these red 
brick walls of Loyola Hall, 
which also houses the li- 
brary and provides a 
conducive atmosphere for 
study. 



Spacious grounds, broad walks, flowers, and foliage make up this imposing view of O'Connell Hall's west por- 
tico. As the newest dormitory on campus, the building employs the latest in facilities for the ease and comfort 
of students. 



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Carroll Hall, the up- 
perclassmen resi- 
dence hall, is the 
oldest dormitory on 
campus. It was built 
in 1928. 



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The St. John Francis Regis Chape, is a brick and auonse.-.ype structure. It was completed 
in 1949 and is the center of religious activity on campus. 







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One of the newer buildings on campus is the Student Center. It 
contains the cafeteria, snack bar, recreation room, and student 
lounge. 



Nearing completion in late March was the Regis College Fieldhouse with a 

seating capacity of 3,500. The Fieldhouse contains a four-lane swimming 

pool, lecture hall, coaches' office and the main gym. 




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High point of the freshman initia- 
tion is the annual hike to Loretto. 
On your mark . . . 



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The New World 



1 here is nothing more miserable than a freshman. Snatched 
from the security of high school, where he was a senior on the 
top of the pile, he is thrust into a new, alien world where he 
must start at the bottom and work his way to the top again. To 
further complicate life for the freshman, he is presented with new 
ways of doing things, then told this is the way they are to be 
done. He is surrounded by strange people, some in the same 
low position he is, others, the upperclassmen, in a higher. These 
make the life of the freshman particularly miserable. They con- 
stantly draw attention to his failings. They are forever demand- 
ing that he make their beds, shine their shoes, and write 
their letters. 



The hike to Loretto Heights is long and hard. But it has its compensations. What 
oriental potentate ever received service and attention like the freshmen shown here. 




The freshmen class picnic at Genessee mountain provides one of the I 
first opportunities for freshmen to get acquainted. Beanies laic j 
aside for a moment, these frosh huddle in a football game. 



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Beanie-wearer, Tom Hogaun, double times down Lowell. 
Commented one freshman: "We walked all the way 
and ran the other half" 





Chow line at the Heights. Hungry freshmen gobbled 
down piles of hot dogs and gallons of punch. 



Upper classmen justice in action: hapless freshman 
does push-ups while sophomores and dates look on. 






For these frosh, college life began with Freshman Week. They met the 
faculty and toured the grounds. Here they are completing one of a 
seemingly endless series of tests. 



Galloping down Lowell, these freshmen demonstrate why this year's hike 
was accomplished in record time. Upper-classmen had little trouble in keep- 
ing the frosh, tired by frequent dog trots, under control. 




1 M 












Tests out of the way, the frosh began to unwind . Here, at Genessee mountain for 
their class picnic, the freshmen play a game of touch football. 



Problem: How many hot dogs and bottles of pop will three hundred hungry 
freshmen consume? Answer: These frosh, standing in line at Genessee, are 
about to find out. 




... Its Challenge is Met 

/\ ny good freshman initiation program should have two points: 
it should somehow assuage the bruised psyches freshmen are bound 
to suffer, yet it should contain challenge enough to destroy the il- 
lusion that college (or anything) is to be had on a silver platter. 
Study the pictures on these pages. They are of freshmen working, 
playing, taking tests, and letting off steam. They speak for Regis' 
freshmen initiation program. 

The crowd begins to gather for the Loretto Hike. Sophomore Pat Hughes, undismayed by the sea of 
beanie covered heads, attempts to bring order out of chaos. 




RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 




A serene and inspiring landscape provides an op- 
portunity for meditation to those who enjoyed the 
closed retreat at the Jesuit retreat house near 
Sedalia, Colo. 



After many delays and postponements, the Mass of 
the Holy Ghost was finally celebrated with the age-old 
and ever inspiring ritual of a Solemn High Mass. 
Held at Loyola Church, it was by far one of the most 
outstanding religious events of the year. Speaking on 
"The Importance of a College Education in America," 
the renowned Father Robert I. Gannon, S.J., did a 
magnificent job on a subject which was most perti- 
nent to everyone. 

Following Regis tradition, the Senior retreat was 
held directly preceding the Thanksgiving holidays. 
Not just another "blood and thunder" retreat, a special 
aura hung about the occasion. Upperclassmen bene- 
fitted from the golden voice and intellect of Father Ed- 
ward L. Maginnis, S.J., who demanded that students 
themselves reason out their difficulties. 

Equally impressive and in perfect command of his 
retreat matter was Father Edward Harris, S.J., who 
was instrumental in guiding the Freshmen along their 
first major college retreat. Father Harris delivered 
many pointed and inspiring talks aimed at enabling 
freshmen to give their life purpose and to make them- 
selves more Christ-like. 






Freshman students concentrate intently on the words of the Rev. Edward 

Harris, S.J., during one of his most interesting talks. 

The experience of their first college retreat proved valuable to the Freshmen. 



A mingling throng of Regis students exchange greetings 

as they stream out of Loyola church following the 

Mass of the Holy Ghost. The mass is held annually in 

early October. 



/ 




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LABS AND CLASSES 



Around Carroll Hall, the late afternoon breeze 
carries strange odors: the rotten-egg fragrance of 
hydrogen sulfide, garlic-like thiophene, petroleum 
ether (a noxious combination of clorox and dead 
animals) and indescribable ammonia. To student 
chemists, biologists and physicists, who have to 
work in the labs, these are all vocational hazards. 
There is simply no other way to acquire practical 
experience in the scientific method. 

Some disciplines, however, can be learned in a 
classroom. Regis has always placed heavy empha- 
sis on that area of studies known as the liberal arts. 
These, which include English, languages, history, 
the social studies, philosophy and theology, are 
best taught by classroom lectures and discussion. 




The Rev. Robert Boyle, S.J., stands proudly before the Music De- 
partment's new Hi-Fi equipment. Father Boyle offered Regis 
students courses in the symphony, the concerto, and 




Senior Bill Zivic, a biology lab instructor, explains a difficult 
point to Freshman, Pete Borer. Several Seniors act as lab 
instructors relieving members of the faculty of an added 
burden. 





Freshman biology students complete their lab notebooks. 
Writing up experiment reports usually takes longer than the 
experiment itself. 



A freshman pre-medical student examines a disected frog during a biology lab period. 
Such experience often proves an invaluable introduction to the scientific method. 




A team of would-be surgeons disects a speciman. Lights in 
the east wing of Carroll Hall where the biology labs 
are located, are often on very late at night as stu- 
dents complete their experiments. 




FRESHMEN FROLIC 

1 he night which the freshmen had been long wait- 
ing for finally arrived. The Shirley-Savoy Hotel 
was the scene of the 1959 Freshmen Frolic. It was a 
junction of beginning and end for the enthusiastic 
freshmen — beginning of the social season and the 
end of initiation. And what an ending it was! At last 
the freshmen could, without fear, laugh and talk out 
loud and smile at whomever they pleased. 

For the freshmen, that which proved paramount 
at the gala gathering, was the presenting of the 
various awards traditional at this annual affair. 
Chosen as the Freshman Sweetheart from three 
lovely Loretto freshmen was Kathy Nickels. Her 
attendants were Liz Kane and Mary Kay Walsh. 
Introduced as Most Outstanding Freshman was Ed 
Coughlin and as Most Humorous, Pat Gallagher. 
Honored as Most Spirited was Tom Welsh; while 
Phil Archibeck was named Glutton for Punishment. 

The Freshman Frolic was highly successful as an 
end which blossomed into a beginning: end of initia- 
tion and the beginning of a college social cycle. The 
dance hinted to the freshmen of the great things 
in store for them. 





Gee! And you want me to come up and see your etchings, too! 



The world, the flesh, and the devi! 




Dr. Wm. Greulich delivers the second lecture 
of the fall series. Dr. Greulich advised parents of re- 
bellious adolescents to use a little 
"judicious neglect." 



MPORTED PROGRAMS 



1 here are gaps in the best education, for reality is too 
wide to be encompassed by any course of study. But 
some of the gaps can be filled. In 1958, Regis College 
initiated a program of inviting prominent lecturers to 
address the student body about subjects of special 
interest. 

The first lecture of the 1959-60 series was Dr. Orlo 
M. Brees, a representative of the National Association 
of Manufacturers. Dr. Brees was well acguainted with 
his topic "What is America?" and in his lecture drew 
upon his experiences as a coal miner, textile worker, 



salesman, teacher, printer, editor and publisher, and 
member of the New York State Legislature. 

A month later, a large audience of students and 
guests heard Dr. Wm. W. Greulich, head of the anatomy 
department at Stanford University Medical School 
speak on "Growing Up and Growing Old." 

The title of the third lecture, "Aristotle, Aquinas, 
and the Soul of Man," was formidable but that did not 
prevent a capacity crowd from hearing Dr. Anton C. 
Pegis discuss the historical transformation which Aris- 
totle's notion of the soul of man received in the philos- 
ophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. 




Regions listen attentively as Dr. Anton C. Pegis explains St. Thomas' doctrine on the soul of man. The lecture drew a capacity crowd 



"Twenty years ago, Thomistic 
philosophy was a fad . . ." 




". . . dabblers were content to fool 
around with it . . ." 




". . . and their respect is that for 
a competent foe." 



". . . but modern philosophers have 
learned to respect it . . ." 





HBH 



MADCAP MASQUERADE 




"Who dot— say who dat?" 



"Smile, there's a talent scout in the audience.' 



"Monsieur, I take you where the tourists never go.' 




"Nobody said anything about Tempest Storm coming! 




» ". . . spread with tomato paste, and bake at 450 
degrees fahrenheit . . ." 





"Oh to be in Paris now that winter's here.' 



"Oo-oo-oo, what a little moonlight can do-oo-o 



1 his was the year for changes everywhere. 

One of the most noticeable to the upperclassmen 
was the change of location for the annual Alpha Delta 
Gamma Halloween Dance. The Grange Insurance 
building held over two-hundred Regis Hobgoblins and 
their dates as they wildly celebrated the event — the 
feast of spooks. 

Fr. Hoewischer, John and Connie Hurst, and Don 
and Denise Pacheco were handed a tough assignment 
of judging the most original costumes. Dave McNelis 
and date copped first honors with their "Raggedy Ann 
and Andy" getup. Running a close second Jim "Key- 
stone Cop" Waters and his captive brought gasps from 
the teeming masses. Tom Connelly was greeted by 
"oohs" and "aahs" from the audience as he appeared 
in an authentic Napoleon costume to take third. 

They're still talking about Bob Bernstein's night- 
shirt and his date's costume that fit so well. Bill Meiers 
will never know how many young ladies he worried 
when he appeared in different places not as a "Keystone 
Cop" but as a Denver Cop. 

Oh, yes, novel refreshments were served. 





This throw is a prerequisite to earning your black belt. 



"Sisters and brothers! Just look at those people a sinnin' and 
a jezabelin'." 




'Gee, Miss Hayes, I want to be a star too. 



THE MATCHMAKER 

JYL ost of the men in the world are fools ..." Fingering his gold 
watch chain, millionaire industrial magnate Horace Vandergelder 
stood at the footlights and reflected upon his philosophy of life. The 
play was Regis College Playhouse's production of Thornton Wilder's 
"The Matchmaker," a combination of outrageous farce and sage 
observation. 

Highlights of the play included Dennis Gallagher's portrayal of 
the pompous and crotchety Vandergelder and Larry Clinton as his 
docile clerk. 

Under the direction of the Rev. Andrew J. Deeman, S.J., the Play- 
house has presented a host of outstanding productions, including 
"All My Sons," "Dial M for Murder," and, of course, "The Matchmaker." 




Just growing pair 



A living testatmonial to Helena Rubenstein. 






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is Jr y "I " 





Queen hopefuls are Patricia Deering, Lillian Kambic, Anne Batt, Susan Sullivan, and Linda Inman. 




Mike Klein and Madeline Stubbers at a recent Com- "I admire him because he's 

munity Chest Ball. and, and if he doesn't get that 






ntelligent, handsome, kind, and 
damn pin outa me, I'll scream.' 



PRESENTATION BALL 



1 he opening round of this year's Regis gueen con- 
test was marked by the introduction of the hopefuls 
by Lou Doyle and his Alpha Kappa Psi brothers at 
the 1959 Presentation Ball on November 16. 

The Grand Ballroom of the Brown Palace West 
Hotel fairly overflowed with Regis men and their 
dates as they danced to the music of Fred Rineguist 
and his orchestra. 

Representing the host fraternity was pretty, 
blonde-haired Pat Deering escorted by Tom Tracy. 
Lovely, laughing Linda Inman was escorted by Dennis 
Gallagher and carried the banner of the Irish Regis 
Association. Alpha Delta Gamma introduced a vi- 
vacious, brown-haired beauty named Lil Kambic who 
arrived on the arm of Terry Welsh. A comely Irish 
miss, Susie Sullivan, was the drawing card for the 
Italian Club and was escorted by Dick Lamirato. And 
gathering honors for the Denver Club, blonde, impish 
Anne Batt appeared, escorted by Bill Marvel. 

Such a collection of feminine beauty sparked a 
vigorous and interesting campaign which climaxed as 
throngs of voters turned out for the election shortly after 
Thanksgiving and finally the enthroning of the lovely 
monarch at the December 7 Coronation Ball. 




"You're a beast to think I'd do anything like that— I'll 
meet you outside in a half hour." 




"I used to be populo 
illness." 



-but then that was before my 





Always the same kind of parties, faces, and small talk- 
gad! What a drag! 



". . . and so that's about all 
my operation." 



there is to tell you about 



We couldn't find a sitter and well— er— here 




Just think, fellas, someday you'll be flying too! 




» 



Does thish bus have a club car? 



MIGRATION 



Whad'yd mean, you don't believe me? 



Awright, awright, who's got the glue? 



Pardon me, but I'll have to have your name 
and phone number. 



I\ t 2:00 o'clock in the afternoon of March 2nd, some 250 Regis men 
and their dates boarded Continental Trailways busses and private cars 
in front of the Regis College Student Center. Their goal was the United 
States Air Force Academy, some forty miles to the south, for the annual 
rivalry between the Rangers and the Academy's Falcons. 

The migration, the first one to the Academy, was jointly sponsored 
by the Executive Board and the Benchwarmers club. 

Although the Rangers lost the game, Ranger fans enjoyed watch- 
ing Benchwarmer I, a bedraggled but game pigeon, being put through 
his maneuvers in spoof of the Academy's falcon mascot. After the 
game, Regions spent several hours in Colorado Springs and, at 10:30 
returned to the campus in time for an 11:00 o'clock check-in. 



I 






"Dahlings! What a surprise seeing you here. 



and you'll find your glass slippers under the bed." 



'Gee Daddy Warbucks, 



Miss Linda Inman, 1959 Queen of Regis 





Come with me to the Casboh. 




CORONATION BALL 



1 he votes were counted, the voting machines put away, 
the posters taken down. Then everybody settled back to 
wait. There was lots of speculation, some betting. Then, 
on December 7 at the Lakewood Country Club, Miss Linda 
Inman, lovely honey-haired freshman from Loretto Heights, 
was crowned queen of Regis. 

The event, of course, was the annual Coronation Ball 
sponsored by the brothers of Alpha Delta Gamma. 

Attendants to the queen were Miss Susie Sullivan, 
escorted by Dick Lamirato of the Italian Club; Miss Lil 
Kambic, escorted by Ray Meyer of Alpha Delta Gamma; 
Miss Anne Batt, escorted by Denver Club President Paul 
Horan; and Miss Pat Deering escorted by Alpha Kappa Psi 
Secretary Tom Tracy. 

At midnight, the strains of Wayne Case's orchestra 
died out and it was all over but the memories. 



"The last bid was $50,000, do I hear more?" 




"I think I swallowed the cork.' 



'Hey, that tickles!" 




The Manq Faces of Linda Inman 



QUEEN 

OF 
REQIS 




r 




\k mmm 




About L'mda and her attendants . . . 



1 he young woman on this page is hard to forget. Her classic beauty and 
her exquisitely fashioned features have made her a hit with Regis men 
who, shortly before Christmas, elected her their queen for 1960. Although 
her eyes are not emerald-green (they are a striking sky-blue), her candi- 
dacy was sponsored by the newly-formed Irish-Regis Association. 

The lovely faces on the next four pages belong to Linda's attendants. 
The first, Miss Lil Kambic, a vivacious brunette sponsored by the brothers 
of Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity, is a child-psychology major at Colo- 
rado University. Also attending C.U., where she is studying education, is 
the Alpha Kappa Psi entry, statuesque Pat Deering. Susie Sullivan, the 
comely Irish miss who represented the Italian Club, is a student in the 
Regis night school. Next is Anne Batt, sunny-haired, impish, a Denver 
career girl. 

How else could such a lovely queen be surrounded but with such 
lovely attendants? 



« 






■'% : '--*■"■; 



LIL KAMBIC 



SUSIE SULLIVAN 




PAT PEERING 



ANNE BATT 



FRESHMEN QUEEN 




KathLj Nickels 




ATTENDANT 
Liz Kane 



: I 



ATTENDANT 
Mart/ Kai( Walsh 



SIP 
W 

II 





Lay faculty guests included accounting in- 
structor, Myles Dolan, and his wife, who 
are shown here enjoying one of the more 
humorous incidents of the evening. 



Student Senate President R. Paul Horan, waxes elo- 
quent over those qualities which a Regis Man of 
the Year should possess. 



Paul J. Toner, winner of the coveted Outstand- 
ing Achievement Award, makes his way to the 
podium to receive recognition. 



; i 




HONORS BANQUET 



1 o realize in himself all the ideals and aims of 
Regis College ... to make the most of his opportun- 
ities ... to integrate himself in the social, intellec- 
tual, and religious life ... to learn for time and 
eternity ... to learn and to live and think as a 
Catholic ..." 

These words, taken from "The Hero on the 
Catholic College Campus" written by Regis student 
John Gribben, became the trade mark of this year's 
renamed awards banguet. 

The 1960 Regis College Honors Banguet, held in 
the Student Center on March 6, was changed in 
more than name. Based upon Mr. Gibben's essay, 
one of three Regis entries to the Jesuit Essay Con- 
test, a new award, called the Regis College Man of 
the Year award, was founded to replace the old 
Outstanding Service and Outstanding Achievement 
trophies. 

In addition to the recognition accorded student 
leaders, three awards were given by the National 
Regis Club: Alumnus Paul J. Toner was recognized 
for outstanding achievement, John Akolt for out- 
standing service, and non-alumnus Alfred E. 
O'Meara was named an Honorary Ranger. 

Executive Board President Paul Horan acted as 
Master of Ceremonies for the evening and the pres- 
entations were made by the Very Rev. Richard F. 
Ryan, S.J., president of the college. Main speaker of 
the evening was John Gribben who read his prize 
winning essay. 



Mr. John Gribben delivers his forceful and thought-provoking paper 
"The Hero on the Catholic College Campus." 




* i>. 










A smiling Ben Cosmi receives Regis College's most distinguished individual award, that of Outstanding 
Scholar. 




^^^"^™ 




"Her purse was open— so I thought she might wanna buy a few 
shares of stock in this night-on-the-town venture." 



'Psssst! Jack— uh— Jackie your strap is-ah-er-showing!" 



/ 




Corolyn and Marsha go through the weekly farce of signing out for "dinner and a show.' 



END 



OF 



THE 



VA/EEK 



1 hank God It's Friday!" 

The weekend offers blessed relief to the average 
bookworn Regis student, and the weekend begins 
Friday afternoon. He may start it off with a phone 
call to Loretto Heights or Colorado Women's Col- 
lege, or a stroll down to the Hilltop, or a tennis 
match. 

In the evening, there are the favorite Friday 
night hangouts: Sam's, The Cubby Hole, Timber 
Tavern, Olympic, King's Court and, at the end of 
the Boulder Turnpike, Tulagi's. 

And Ernies'. Sooner or later during the week- 
end, everyone ends up at Ernies'. For those who 
prefer to go formal, there is the Tiffin, Henritzes' 
and Baur's. In season, there is hockey at the D.U. 
arena. The Denver Auditorium often features spe- 
cial events such as it did when the Kingston Trio 
came into town. Pseudo beatniks can visit the 
Exodus. 

Some weekend plans are not quite so elaborate: 
an evening in Machebeuf Hall at LHC, a "carda- 
thon" in somebody's room, a weekend working on 




"We who are about to be arrested salute you, the officers of the law, who have made 
this show possible." 








"I certainly didn't like that crack about me not missing man 
Furthermore my mother doesn't wear combat boots." 



"What do you mean— you forgot your ID. 




"At the age of two I lost both legs— then I got polio and later at the age of 10 I was struck by a truck.. 





"There was just Sebastian and I — and then SUDDENLY LAST 
SUMMER!" 



'Alex! What a pleasant surprise! You big silly! I thought you'd 
et me know the minute you returned from the Riveria." 




and then after the Gotham Ball we had Daddy's Imperial and Mark smashed it up on the way to the < 



AND MORE 



the KREG studios or just a quiet walk down to 
Federal. 

About Sunday afternoon everything begins to 
settle down. Those who wasted Friday and Satur- 
day in merry-making get back to the books. The 
intellectuals watch T.V. and brace themselves for 
Monday. 





'That foamy stuff I drink all day until slowly— s-l-o-w-l-y— memory fades away.' 



"As I said before, I've seen you operate— and as I 
said before, I'll see you around." 




BATCHIN' 




For those long, cold winter evenings, television proves most popular among off 
campus students— Jerry Beacom proves our point. 



Jim Gahl enjoys a late sleep-in period— something boarders rarely achie 
because of the racket in the halls. 



Jim Conaghan checks an assignment with a friend over the 'phone as he enjoys the peace and solitude of a study hour in his pine-paneled den. 





*^_yi^ 



Apartment life has its trying moments as 
shown on the face of Jim Obst who is in 
the process of tidying up his "pad." 









*m cm 



/ of t^Ii? ^ 



"V*tC" 




A quick splash and then breakfast by poolside is enjoyed by Harold Marcotte, Don Hall, and Jerry Haushalter 
which shows that living off campus doesn't always consist of drab basement rooms and poor food. 



1 he man who lives off campus will tell you that his way of life has its definite advan- 
tages. For the serious minded, privacy, and relative quiet afford an ideal environment 
for study. Those less dedicated to the pursuit of learning relish the independence and 
the numerous opportunities for the uninhibited release of tension. 

The majority of apartment dwellers maintain that by acquiring valuable culin- 
ary and bartending talent they save money in this mode of existence. They may, but 
in the process many of them sacrifice the security of three squares per day in the school 
cafeteria. 



MARRIED LIFE 




Who says that the day of the universal man has 
passed? Certainly not those who realize the diverse 
education received by those members of the Regis 
student body who are married. 

Besides the usual academic training, the mar- 
ried student acguires practical experience in every- 
thing from blending the ingredients of baby's 
formula to giving Junior detailed explanations on 
why he should not play with the mechanical draw- 
ing set. And of course there's the problem of 
placating the angry wife who feels that she's 
playing second fiddle to someone named Thomas 
Aguinas. A full or part-time job imposes added 
burdens. 

There are advantages. The married student's 
shirts are always (or usually) ironed, and there are 
wifely condolences when a disappointing grade 
is encountered. 



Early afternoon sees Don take time out to play with future Ranger, 
Don Jr. 




Junior Don Pacheco interrupts his studies to say good-night to his 
18-month-old son Don Jr. Don and his wife, Denise own their own 
home in East Denver. 



Senior Jim Wetzel relaxes with his wife Barbara. The Wetzel's live in an apartment in 
East Denver, and Jim commutes to Regis every morning. 




~~~J 




) 



Frank Maggio takes a break from his studies to play with his daughter, Marthc 



Mike Burke relaxes with his wife, 
Virginia, after a strenuous day at 
school. Mike and his wife were mar- 
ried in early February. 





'That's one thing I like about Kelly— he's always in bed by 9 a.m. and if you want to sneak out for a piiza, you can! 





"You say you have the dread ma- 
hacacas and won't be able to go 
Friday night . . . ?" 



"By the way, where do you want 
the clippers sent if you mess up on 
this job?" 




"Watch out tonight girls — I'm a 
tigerrrrrrrr." 



BOARDER BEDLAM 




Meanwhile, M r . Tracer, 
keener than most people, 
relaxes in his study. 





1 here are times when life in the dorms should be 
described by a war correspondent! It is sometimes a 
chaotic world with a handful of dedicated dorm pre- 
fects struggling to maintain order. 

Carroll Hall, the oldest dormitory on cam- 
pus, is the residence hall for upperclassmen while 
O'Connell Hall is reserved for the freshness 



and exuberance of freshman and Sophomores. 
There are a number of things to do on campus: 
Television in the Carroll Hall lounge and in the 
Student Center, the snack bar, the pool room and, for 
fanatics, the library in Loyola Hall. Outdoors, there 
is washing one's car in the parking lot, walking down 
to the lake or just sitting around in the sun. 




POLITICS 



1 he first week of October this year saw a hard 
fought contest for executive offices in the Senior, 
Junior, and Sophomore classes. Several weeks 
after, when subsequent animosities had cooled and 
the delegates were properly seated in the general 
assembly, Freshman voters squared off and named 
their slate of officers. 

That was the warm up. After Christmas came 
the executive board festivities. Campaigning had 
been progressing in a relatively smooth manner 
until Lou Doyle's column, "The Bull Session," in 
the Brown and Gold predicted a clean sweep for the 
Executive Party and blew the top off the entire 
show. A combination political rally-jazz session 
and a student assembly highlighted the events 
and culminated in a victory split between both 
parties. 



Members of the outgoing Executive Board register voters in this year's Executive Board 
elections. 535 students went to the polls, but less than one-half of them returned for 
subsequent run-off election. 




Senior Jack Bailey and Senior class presidential candidate Jim Obst discuss politics under the watchful eyes of Obst's rival, Dave Rottino. Rottino, whose picture 
appears at the top left of the poster in the background, won the election. 





'The MRK Party intends to put Regis on the map 





Executive Board presidential candidates, John Foley 

and Paul Horan shake hands after a 

student assembly. The assembly, which was 

held in the Student Center was called to introduce 

the contending MRK and Executive parties 

to the student body. 

Looking on is outgoing president, Blair Farrel. Horan 

was the winner of the hotly contested race. 



and the establishment of an alumni directory.' 



/ 



IMPRESSIONS 



"long 

Party SULLIV/ 



iwWMMBL.vib 



'Hfcn 



oitfenl 



\ 



p jrty COCHRAN -Seaefary 



Wrong 
Party 



BENNETT -w w 



Party 



It's quite possible. 



'CHRISTENSEN 






W e found these pictures while cleaning 
up the dark room. Several of them are 
easy to identify, the others are not. But all 
of them seemed in some way, typical of the 
Regis scene. Campus politics, that lovable 
old rebel-rouser, Dennis Joseph Patrick 
Gallagher, campaigning for Linda Inman 
. . . the smell of formaldehyde and the ex- 
posed innards of a frog . . . the end of a 
perfect evening . . . relaxation in the pool 
room. There are other impressions that 
could not be captured on film. 

Muttering voices somewhere in DeSmet 
Hall as the newspaper staff works to meet 
a deadline . . . the terrifying impact of a 
Maginnis lecture . . . pizza stained notes 
for a term paper ... an afternoon bridge 
game in the student Center lounge . . . 
These are the impressions that, somehow, 
have been left with us. We will never re- 
member them at class reunions, but they 
will come back in the small hours of the 
morning as we slosh through the aftermath 
of a winter's storm, as we pause to remem- 
ber what it was like when life was lucky 
and we didn't have a wage to earn. 




MyA 



Kf&Hfc 



'A little to the right— now up a bit— that's it, ahhhhh! 



"And to all those who say we can't put a woman in the 
White House " 




"My braces are caught!!!" 




Why Johnny can't read. 




U/E TALKED ABOUT 



1 he cost of room and board is raised . . . invasion by the 
N.D.H.A. . . . Tom Cullen loses four wheels . . . war declared 
against the N.D.H.A. . . . Frs. Boyle and Maginnis recruit for 
Music I . . . Gallagher founds the I.R.A. . . . Regis invaded by 
insurance salesmen . . . Student Senate votes to publish elec- 
tion results . . . Vescovo protests . . . class elections; Foley 
beats Horan ... a freak September storm threatens Regis' 
trees . . . queen candidates presented . . . Orlo Brees initiates 
lecture series . . . Lou Doyle's "Bull Session" accuses Student 
Senate of misusing funds . . . students submit petition demand- 
ing accounting . . . steel strike continues; work on fieldhouse 
slows . . . frats pledge . . . THE MATCHMAKER opens . . . 
KREG bans "Rock N' Roll," makes front page of NEWS . . . 
Interclub Council formed . . . Who's Who-ers named . . . de- 
baters best Air Force Academy . . . Gerstner, Horan take 
honors in All Jesuit Debate Tournament in Chicago . . . I.R.A. 
loses, then finds Kennedy at airport . . . Linda Inman elected 
queen . . . Minority agitates "Rock N' Roll" question . . . Regis 
students disperse for Christmas season . . . Colorado Aggies 
beat Rangers . . . Denver Club sponsors ski trip morning after 
Coronation . . . semester exams . . . steel strike settled; work 
resumes on fieldhouse . . . Executive Board, Athletic Department 
involved in ticket fiasco . . . ADG honors Fr. Murray . . . Bench- 
warmers organized . . . Executive Board elections set . . . Lou 
predicts . . . Horan wins . . . Rangers beat Aggies . . . Tracy 
attends Ford debut . . . Marvel lampoons Academy . . . L.H.C. 
throws surprise leap year dance . . . Cosimi named Outstand- 
ing Scholar, eight named Men of the Year at Honors Banquet 
. . . Regis migrates to Academy, loses . . . fieldhouse nears 
completion . . . Irish and Pseudo-Irish celebrate St. Patty's Day 
. . . Annual staff grows irritable . . . Ranger Day . . . Prom . . . 
comprehensives . . . Seniors graduate, depart. 



The social success of 

the season 

u/as not a dance 

or a dinner. 

It was something 

new/: 



RANQER 

DAY 

1959 



? ■ 




In poses reminiscent of a heroic Greek statue, Regions jostle for the pus 

IVlay is more than buds in the trees around Carroll 
Hall and tulips poking up through the warm soil of 
Brother Knoll's garden. May, to the average Regis stu- 
dent, is a nightmarish tangle of term papers, exams, and 
book reports. 

Early in the year, Regis College Student Senate had 
begun work on a sort of serum to help Regis students 
overcome the battle fatigue and boredom of this last 
month. On Sunday, May 3, Regis men and their lovely 
guests were innoculated. 

Ranger Day was a success from the start. Three 
special guests — the night school's Andole Murray, Loretto 
Heights' Patsy Gales, and Colorado Women's College's 



Expression of Loretto Heights' Pam Condon typifies Ranger Day spirit. 




Venting their aggressions after long months cooped up in classrooms, students watch Junior Mike Wells 
attack an innocent 1948 Pontiac. 



mwx\ 





Central City favorite, Danny Williams, entertains the Ranger Day 
crowd with pops and spiritual numbers. Backing Williams was 
Jack Consoer's Dixieland group. 



Another attraction of the Ranger Day talent show was this song and 
dance trio. The girls sang a high temperature rendition of "steam heat." 





A Komp'ml Stotr\p'\rf Conclusion 

Nancy Galloway — -were introduced. Then everyone 
trooped over to the softball field to watch the faculty take 
a shellacking at the hands of an impromptu student 
team. Only a sudden rain storm saved the faculty from 
complete humiliation. 

Regis men and their dates watched the storm sput- 
ter out from the Student Center; then they moved to 
the faculty parking lot where they began to reduce a 
1948 Pontiac to scrap metal. A boy's push-ball game in 
the stadium looked, from the stands, like a swarm of 
ants struggling with a grape. On the field, it was more 
barked shins than anything. 

Meanwhile, back in the Student Center, Dennis 
Patrick Gallagher and his traveling troubadours began 
their variety show. Various local acts gave their all but 
the real show-stopper was honey-haired, honey-voiced 
Carolyn Ellingson from CWC who sang "Cry Me A 
River" like she meant it. 

The clouds continued to snarl all afternoon. A 
Bar-B-Q dinner was served and then everyone settled 
down in the dining room to listen to Boulder's Jack 
Consoer and his group belt out dixie land all evening. 
They brought the day to a real rompin', stompin' 
conclusion. 




Somewhere in the middle of this struggling mass is a pushball 
lent to Regis by the Air Force Academy. The ball remained 
uninjured. 



Two members of the Regis College night school sing "Happy Talk" from the 
musical South Pacific. Almost a dozen acts contributed their efforts to the 
talent show. 





I 

L 



Instructing neophyte team members in the art of fencing is Geza Kmetty, prolific fencing master, who was instrumental in founding this sport on campus 



The completion of the new Regis 



fieldhouse this year enabled the 



college to expand ar\ already large 



athletic program. Whether fencing, 



skiing, placing basketball, baseball 



or anu, other pastime, there is a 



sport for almost everu. Regis student. 



ATHLETICS 




BOOSTERS 



1 he year 1959 to 1960 saw a strong increase in 
the Ranger yell-sgual spirit. Behind the organizing 
ability and example set by the Benchwarmers and 
the co-ordinating of the cheerleaders, the fans be- 
gan to enjoy cheering. 

The megaphone set, comprised of four Regis 
and four Loretto Heights students, was one of the 
most enthusiastic teams to ever co-ordinate the 
morals and pep of both the fans and the players. 
Their persistent pleas for more support gradually 
overcame the prevalent attitude that the display of 
student morale was sophomorish and finally gained 
the unity of the majority of the student body. 

These generators of school spirit along with the 
Benchwarmers and a strong contingent of fans 
journeyed en masse with the team to Fort Collins 
and Colorado Springs for the Aggies and Air Force 
Academy games. Some of the more faithful mem- 
bers of the yell-sgual also were on hand to greet the 
team at the airport after their road trips. 

With the encouragement of examples set by 
the "boosters" of 1959-1960, future seasons should 
find more than ordinary spirit behind the team. 



Avid fans, behind the zealous organizing of the Benchwarmers and Cheerleaders, faith- 
fully supported the Rangers throughout the season. 



Tense moments of the game are revealed in the emotional impact mirrored on the faces of the spectators as they carefully follow each play. 




&JT* 




COACHES 



When Joe Hall took over as head coach at Regis 
College, he inherited one veteran, senior Dennis 
Boone. He hurriedly recruited six freshmen, ex- 
pertly molded his charges into a green but prom- 
ising team, and gave Regis a more than lucrative 
season. 

Hall came to Regis in September, 1958, after 
earning coach-of-the-year honors in the Mid- 
Kentucky Conference. During the 1958-59 season, 
Hall coached the Regis Jayvees to a 14-3 season, 
their best in nearly a decade. He was named head 
coach last April, topping a field of more than thirty 
applicants. 

Even while masterminding his green varsity 
team to victory over such teams as the highly- 
touted Oklahoma City University, Coach Hall re- 
tained his duties as Jayvee mentor. 

Coach Hall's assistant, Arthur W. Kaleher, 
joined the Regis Athletic staff with the start of 
the Fall semester as assistant coach and director of 
intramurals. Kaleher, like Hall, comes from Shep- 
herdsville Kentucky High School where he coached 
the swimming team, which experience will come in 
handy at Regis with the completion of the field- 
house. 



Head Coach, Joe Hall, emphatically directs his team fr 
coach, Kaleher, watches the action intently. 



the sidelines as assistant 



Assistant Coach, Kaleher, reviews team statistics. 



Boone and Hall map out their pre-game strategy. 





Regis 


67 Nebraska Wesleyan Univ. 


64 


Regis 


53 


Colorado State Univ. 


86 


Regis 


61 


Colorado State Univ. 


56 


Regis 


57 


Pepperdine College 


61 


Regis 


83 


S.W. Missouri State 


79 


Regis 


80 


Omaha University 


67 


Regis 


55 


Mankato State 


53 


Regis 


83 


Montana State College 


91 


Regis 


74 


University of Arizona 


69 


Regis 


47 


Idaho State College 


61 


Regis 


86 


New Mexico Highlands 


92 


Regis 


56 


Idaho State College 


71 


Regis 


82 


E. Montana State College 


64 


Regis 


55 


Montana State College 


73 


Regis 


58 


Oklahoma City Univ. 


53 


Regis 


78 


Westminster College 


64 


Regis 


72 


Xavier University 


87 


Regis 


93 


St. Ambrose College 


86 


Regis 


51 


Creighton University 


75 


Regis 


63 


Oklahoma City Univ. 


79 


Regis 


58 


Air Force Academy 


65 




A badly-needed basket brings Coaches Kaleher and Hall to their feet to further 
encourage the team. 



Wide-eyed coach and players watch their team come from behind to overcome th e highly-touted Oklahoma City. 



WB 




VARSITY 

BASKETBALL 



m 



WULS. 



P I 



k 1 ^ 


1 f " 


^^ Sf ^ 




^B 


1 




i 



THE SEASON 



1 crke six freshmen, add the same number of sopho- 
mores, two juniors, and one senior, and go out to 
oppose teams such as Colorado State University and 
Oklahoma City University. This is what Coach Joe 
Hall faced at the beginning of the 1959-1960 basket- 
ball season. To come up with a 10-11 record under 
such seemingly insurmountable obstacles took more 
than a fine display of coaching ability and team de- 
termination. Yet this is what the Rangers can look 
back upon for the season. 

Only Dennis Boone, the Rangers' classy backcourt 
scoring ace, had solid varsity experience before the 
season. Once past him the Ranger lineup looked 
promising but as green as the proverbial grass. 

Hall managed to blend Boone's dazzling floor play 
and experience with the potential of his neophytes and 
develop a surprising combination. And the determina- 



tion and spirit of this combination rapidly welded it 
into a working unit. 

Some of the highlights of the season include the 
winning of the Nebraska Wesleyan Tournament Title, 
a thrilling overtime victory over Colorado State Uni- 
versity, and a just as thrilling overtime loss to Montana 
State College, and a strong come back rally against 
the Air Force Academy which died only in the closing 
seconds of the game. 

Add to these the personal victories of the individual 
team members — Dennis Boone, whose jersey number 
will be retired at Regis in unprecedented recognition; 
Louis Stout, who as a freshman often showed the scor- 
ing potential needed to replace Boone's loss; Dean 
Sullivan and Gary DeMarlie, who have established 
themselves as backcourt demons— and the summary 
can be only one of praise and anticipation of the 
1960-61 edition of the Rangers. 



VARSITY TEAM— First Row: Jerry Tellez, Paul Frey, Gary DeMarlie. Second Row: Asst. Coach Bill Kaleher, Jerry Sherman, Dick Hoogerwerf, Dennis Boone, Dean Sulli- 
van, Pat Jenkins, Head Coach Joe Hall. Third Row: Ken Williams, Daryl Bartz, Bill Kelly, Tom Hitzelberger, James Jones, Charles Bocock, Louis Stout, Mgr. Don Ricken. 





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As Paul Frey surveys the action, an elusive ball escapes Dennis Boone, Jim Jones, and Louis Stout. 



Master of basketball strategy, Dennis Boone was the 
unifying force throughout the season for the inex- 
perienced Rangers. 





Freshman star, Louis Stout, "flys high" for s< 
have caught some infraction in the backgrounc 



but the referee seems to 



Sweeping by defenders Boone often made the opposition look awkward with 
his sizzling floor play. 



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Grim determination and delight in possession of the ball seem to issue from Bill Kelly's gritted teeth as he catches the Southwestern Missourians flatfooted. 





Freshman Louis Stout provided many a thrill for the Ranger 
fans with his spectacular board play and hook shot. 



1 he Rangers opened the hoopster season with a 
non-too-impressive 67-64 victory over Nebraska Wes- 
leyan in the Holy Family Gym. Boone broke the Regis 
career field goal record in this game by collecting 
twenty points and a career total of 603 field goals with 
twenty games still ahead of him. It was the three clutch 
goals of Jim Jones, however, which preserved the vic- 
tory in the final seconds. Two nights later, the Rangers' 
inexperience caught up with them as CSU rapped out 
an 86-53 win despite Boone's twenty-nine points. This 
loss was avenged one week later as freshmen, Stout 
and Sullivan, paced a comeback which netted Regis a 
61-56 overtime victory. Stout hit twenty-one points, six 
of them in the overtime, Sullivan hit ten points after 
the half and showed outstanding defensive play. 

Pepperdine College was the next opponent to in- 
vade the Ranger Court. They took advantage of Regis 
"freshmenitus" to overcome a nine point deficit in the 
final five minutes and ice the Rangers with a 61-57 
verdict. Dennis Boone steered the Rangers past highly 
ranked Southwest Missouri State in the next start, in a 
game that saw the score tied or change hands twenty- 
seven times. Boone finally directed and fired Regis 
to an 83-79 victory. He received a tremendous lift in 
the second half from Jerry Sherman and Bill Kelly. 
The Hallmen left Denver December 27 to open warfare 
in the Nebraska Wesleyan Holiday Tournament. After 
socking Omaha University by an 80-67 margin and 
slipping by Mankato State by two points, the Rangers 
returned to Denver with the Tournament title tucked 
away. 



High on the boards, Ken Williams always seemed to be able to grab the 
crucial rebounds when the score was deadlocked. 





Relief standout Ken Williams stretches for control of the ball or pos- 
sible tip-in. 



All-American Dennis Boone lures his defenseman out of position with his deft 
"ball-magic." 



Entire Ranger team closes in on loose ball as Boone struggles against lone Arizona opponent. 







T- 



IVLontccna State's Bobcats clipped a Regis College 
upset bid in an overtime for the Rangers' third loss. 
Regis had led during the first half but lost its eight 
point advantage early in the second half to fight a 
see-saw battle the rest of the way. It was 78-79 at 
the end of the regulation time, but the Bobcats out- 
scored the Rangers 12-4 in the overtime. Stout was 
Regis' high scorer with 22. 

Dermis Boone was the main spark in the next Regis 
victory, but Stout hit the key baskets. The outing was 
against the Arizona Wildcats, and Regis' numerous 
mistakes were only offest by Arizona's excessive foul- 
ing as the Rangers eked out a 74-69 win. Boone tossed 
in 23 points and Stout picked off 29 rebounds and 11 
points. Three nights later, Idaho State put the Rangers 
in a defensive vise and treated Hallmen to a 61-47 
loss, their fourth of the season. 



Louis Stout deftly clears the rebound in the Oklahoma City game. 



Jim "the stilt" Jones reaches up to dunk one as his opponents 
watch helplessly. 




Junior Ken Williams was a stalwart in every clutch situation 
with his rebounding and defense. 




I 



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1 he second half of the Ranger season proved to be 
much more grueling than the first. With all but two 
of the last 1 1 games being scheduled on the road, Regis 
was able to pick up only four wins with seven losses. 
On January 16 the Ranger guintet journeyed to 
Las Vegas, N.M., to tangle with a red hot New Mexico 
Highlands University. Bothered by a tight zone, Regis 
trailed most of the ball game and were behind by one 
point at the half. The New Mexico Cowboys returned 
to the floor to shoot a blistering 68 per cent, and this 
proved to be the Rangers' undoing although they hit 
a highly respectable 56 per cent. Boone bagged 27 
points but it was not enough to offset the 92-86 margin. 
Idaho State again proved to be too much for the 
Rangers as they handed Regis its third straight loss on 
a 71-56 note. Boone was held to only 12 points and he 



fouled out with six minutes left in the game. 

Smarting from the defeat at the hands of Idaho 
State's Bengals, Regis took on Eastern Montana State 
two nights later. Boone was at his sizzling best in this 
game as he led the Rangers to an 82-64 victory. He 
put on such a sensational display of shooting that even 
the home town crowd roared its approval. In the final 
tally Boone had collected 41 points and scored 19 field 
goals, a new single-game record. 

Eastern Montana's sister college, Montana State, 
clipped Boone's and Regis' wings two night later. For 
only the third time in his career Boone was held under 
10 points and the Rangers fell before the Bobcats, 73-55. 
Only Stout was able to score in the double figures for 
the Rangers as he picked up 12 points. 




Exuberant teammates carry Jerry Tellez off the floor after he cooly sank two free throws to ice the victory over Oklahoma. 



"That shot will bring down rain!' 




Sophomore Bill Kelly was high scorer for the 
Jayvee squad and a dependable varsity reliever. 



Gary DeMarlie often sparked the Ranger attack, 
was especially outstanding in the Air Force game. 



Dick Hoogerwerf provided strong support for the 
guard positions and was a real offensive threat 
from far out. 




\Jn February 10, the Rangers returned to familiar 
grounds for the only two home games of the second 
half of the season. Oklahoma City University was the 
first sguad to test Regis after their trying road trip. 
The invading chiefs found that the Rangers had be- 
come well-seasoned and they fell before a Boone-Stout 
onslaught, 58-53. Particularly prominent, too, was the 
blanket Dean Sullivan threw on Oklahoma's Bud Sah- 
maunt. Sahmaunt had scored twenty-two points be- 
fore Sullivan was sent in, and Sullivan completely 
whitewashed him in the final fourteen minutes. Mean- 
while Boone and Stout were collecting twenty and 
eighteen points, respectively. With fifty-one seconds 
left Boone was upended on a driving layup and was re- 
placed by Jerry Tellez. The 5-6 marksman calmly hit 
two free throws which iced the victory. 

Before a standing-room only crowd, the Rangers 
closed out their home games in the Holy Family Gym 
by spanking Westminster of Salt Lake City, 78-64. 
Three freshmen — Stout, Sullivan, and Bartz — were the 
factors which finally coagulated Regis' ragged play 
and turned a close one into an easy victory. Stout col- 
lected twenty-three points for game honors. 

Fresh from this successful home stand. Regis took 
on Xavier University of Cincinnati. Once again Boone 
took command and bagged twenty-eight points; but the 
Rangers bowed to the strong Musketeers, 87-72. More 
than 400 spectators from Cynthiana and Shepherds- 
ville, Ky., were on hand to root for their favorite 
sons — Stout and Jones. 



Daryl "the barrel" Barti drives 
against Westminster. 



for a layup 





Jerry Sherman, reserve center and forward, was 
double threat in both scoring and ball-handling. 



The undying spirit of freshman guard, Dean Sullivan, 
especially sparked the Rangers in the Arizona game. 




Stout and Boone wearily leave the floor between halves of the Idaho State game. 



Jim Jones was one of Coach Hall's most re- 
warding freshmen and quickly became adapted 
to college competition. 





On February 23 Regis invaded Davenport, Iowa, 
and unveiled their sharpest shooting of the season 
to St. Ambrose College. In a foul-filled game, 
Stout fired in 33 points and Boone was right be- 
hind with 28 to lead the Rangers to a 93-86 victory. 

The next tilt was with Creighton University 
where once again the Rangers lost their shooting 
eyes. After hitting 38 percent of their shots, the 
Rangers went 10 minutes without a field goal to 
end the game on the wrong side of a one-sided 
75-51 score. Boone was high scorer with 12 but this 
was far below his average. 

Two nights later on a return engagement with 
Oklahoma City, the Rangers were again on the 
short end of the score, 79-63. The Chiefs grabbed 
the lead and held it all the way by downing exactly 
half of their field goal attempts. 

The climatic game of the year — against the Air 
Force Academy — again turned out to be one of 
the most thrilling. Some 250 students of Regis and 
Loretto Heights followed the team to Colorado 
Springs only to see their team go down in defeat. 
The Falcons used a pressing man-for-man defense 
to force Regis into miscues and soon had a strong 
lead. In the second half Boone who had four fouls 
came off the bench to lead a comeback which 
whittled the lead to five points, but the Rangers 
could get no closer and finally fell, 65-58. 



Dean Sullivan 
valuable both 



/as one of the pre-season favorites and he definitely proved to be in- 
defense and offense. 



Freshman standout, Louis Stout retains posses- 
sion of the ball but is surrounded by defenders. 





Boone's all-out determination and spirit were 
the main factors which led Regis to success 
this season. 



Sophomore Paul Frey was more than an idle threat 
to many a Ranger opponent. 





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Slugger John McCoy safely steals home as both umpire and Bears' pitcher look 
in awe at overthrown ball. 



BASEBALL 



Oix years of baseball coaching at Regis on the part of 
Harvey Moore ended last spring on a triumphant note of 
fifteen wins and five losses. Predominantly composed of 
sophomore "veterans," the Rangers were expected by in- 
siders to be one of the best teams in the school's history; 
the insiders were by no means disappointed! 

The big bats of the returning lettermen. Herb Millard, 
John McCoy, Dick Hoogerwerf, and Frank Blatter supplied 
the scoring punch while the strong arms of Jerry Tellez and 
Jerry Smith proved especially effective in checking the 
opposition's bats. Although opening with a loss to Mines, 
the team showed new strength with each game and cli- 
maxed the season with a thrilling 4-2 win over the Colo- 
rado State Bears. This win was especially gratifying for the 
Rangers since Colorado State was chosen as a representa- 
tive to the College World Series. 




Batter, catcher, and umpire all focus their eyes on the ball as Dick Hoogerwerf 
drives it to the outfield. 



VJ 



Happy teammates rush to meet Ken Williams 
as he rounds third after homerun drive. 





scoreboard 


Regis 7 


Mines 8 


Regis 19 


Mines 8 


Regis 2 


Mines 4 


Regis 7 


Denver University 5 


Regis 12 


Lowry Air Base 7 


Regis 11 


Colorado College 3 


Regis 4 


Western St. College 3 


Regis 7 


Western St. College 3 


Regis 9 


Air Force Academy 7 


Regis 3 


Colo. State College 3 


Regis 6 


Air Force Academy 2 


Regis 6 


Lowry Air Base 5 


Regis 7 


Denver University 4 


Regis 9 


Denver University 5 


Regis 10 


Western St. College 8 


Regis 3 


Adams State College 6 


Regis 6 


Adams State College 10 


Regis 10 


Colorado College 7 


Regis 14 


Colorado College 11 


Regis 4 


Colo. State College 2 




Coach Moore checks the batting order before Colorado State College game. 



VARSITY TEAM— Front Row: Tom Malley, Isidro Rubi, Jerry Tellez, Bob Christensen, John McCoy, Frank Blatter, Jerry Thiesen. Back Row: Dick Hoogerwerf, Herb 
Millard, Dick Barteau, George Falagrady, Mike McGinnis, Ken Williams, Jerry Smith, Coach Harvey Moore. 




JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



U nder the tutelage of Coach Joe Hall, the Jayvees 
this year displayed an extremely potent and well- 
rounded attack. In fact, in their four major outings, the 
team established a 95-point-per-game average while 
limiting their opponents to only 70. 

The purpose of the Jayvee program is to familiar- 
ize new men with Regis' style of play and to give them 
the needed experience in college action. This purpose 
was certainly borne out by such freshmen as Dean 
Sullivan, Pat Jenkins, Dctryl Bartz, and Charles Bocock 
who led the Jayvee attack and who also turned in out- 
standing performances when they were called upon 
for varsity action. 

The season opened with a 114-54 scalping of the 
Rocky Mountain Arsenal team. Dean Sullivan and Jerry 
Sherman captured game honors with 17 points apiece. 
They were ably assisted by Jerry Tellez, Bill Kelly, John 
Greiten, Mike Ewers, and Tom Hopkins, all of whom 
scored in the double figures in the lopsided rout. 

The quintet's next victim was Colorado State Col- 
lege who fell beneath the accurate firing of Bill Kelly 



and Daryl Bartz by a 108-85 margin. Kelly collected 
26 points and Bartz was close behind with 19 in this 
contest. 

In the rematch game, the Jayvees were held to a 
more orthodox score but they managed to level CSC 
for the second time with a 79-62 margin this time. Once 
again Kelly and Bartz took command with 25 and 24 
points respectively. Tellez and Sullivan chipped in 
with 13 and 10 points. 

Their fourth outing saw the baby Rangers sustain 
their first loss in another relatively low-scoring contest. 
Despite Gary DeMarlie's fine play and 20 points, the 
Colorado State University Jayvees managed to over- 
come the Rangers by an 82-76 score. Sullivan and Kelly 
also turned in strong performances in the losing cause 
with 17 and 13 points respectively. 

Most of the men on the Jayvee squad saw some 
action with the varsity team during the season and 
Ranger fans can predict a well-rounded varsity next 
year. 



J-V TEAM— First Row: Paul Frey, Jerry Sherman, Bill Kelly, Dean Sullivan, Gary DeMar 
Tellez. Third Row: Bob Simon, Chuck Swanson, Charles Bocock, Mike Ewers. 



ie. Second Row: Tom Hopkins, John Greiten, Pat Jenkins, Bob Kraus, Jerry 








scoret 


:>oard 




Regis 


114 




Rocky Mt. Arsenal 


54 


Regis 


108 




Colorado State College 


85 


Regis 


79 




Colorado State College 


62 


Regis 


76 




Colorado State Univ. 


82 



This tip off with the Colorado State Rams proved to be the beginning of the 
Jayvees only loss for the season. 



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Charles Bocock, a former Canon City Abbey star, 
rapidly developed on the J-V squad and saw limited 
action with the varsity. 



Pat Jenkins promises to be more than valuable in 
filling the vacancy which will be left by Boone in 
the backcourt. 



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Center Jerry Sherman evades his defender to get the shot away, but it was to 
team lost its first game in four outings. 



as the Jayvee 







Freshman Dean Sullivan displays the expert form which soon moved him up 
to the varsity. 





Acting captain, Bill Kelly, meets the officials and the Ram captain before 
the game. 





Bill Kelly, Gary DeMarlie, and Jerry Sherman all crowd under the basket to 
force the Rams out of position. 



Little Gary DeMarlie goes high for the rebound against two Rams as Bill 
Kelly moves in to assist. 




Dctryl Bartz, who missed the first half of the season 
with a broken foot, improved later to earn a position 
on the varsity traveling squad. 



Tom Hitzelberger alternated between the Jayvee's 
and the varsity turning in topnotch performances for 
both. 



Jerry Tellez, Regis' hustling guard, was al- 
ways the Jayvee sparkplug and often came 
off the bench to inspire the varsity. 




SKIING 



Accidents and expense detract from the enjoyment of 
the sport somewhat, but, despite the disadvantages, skiing 
is gaining in popularity. Since Colorado is blessed with 
some of the finest ski areas in the country, all manner of 
enthusiasts find their way to the hills. 

An unexpected pack in October gave Regis snow 
bunnies an early start this year. On Fridays and Satur- 
days, devotees of the sport flocked to Berthould and Love- 
land passes and Arapahoe Basin, some of them on bus 
trips sponsored by the Ski Club or Denver Club. 

From Thanksgiving until the last snowman dies in his 
Bermuda shorts, skiing is the most popular outdoor sport at 
Regis. And following activities on the slopes, hot buttered 
rums at the Red Onion bring a perfect day to a perfect close. 



Steve French shows that even pleasure skiing demands 
concentration. 




It's a long way back down 




Intercollegiate ski competition at Steamboat Springs always attracts large crowds of spectators to this world-famous ski area northwest of Denver. 




FENCINq 



Geza Kmetty gives Bob Bowles, Jack Becker, and Bill Lombardo last minute instructions 
before the Air Force Academy meet. 



1 he Regis Fencing team is in its second year of 
competition under the able leadership of its stu- 
dent instructor, Geza Kmetty. In the two times that 
the team has participated in meets, it has won one 
and lost one. The Air Force Academy bested the 
team by one point. Colorado University has so far 
been the team's only foil for the season, a complete 
victory for the team. 

Regis' fencing team's total enrollment, includ- 
ing the club, is about thirty, with about twelve of- 
ficial members of the team. The other participants 
are in the fencing club which meets in order to 
learn the principles and rules of the sport. It 
amounts to a junior varsity team which does not 
enter into competition. 

The club has grown from a non-existent organi- 
zation to one of the most popular sports at Regis. 
The coach and instructor, Geza Kmetty, introduced 
the sport to Regis in 1958 when he came here from 
Hungary. In his native country, where fencing is 
regarded as the national sport, Kmetty was the 
nominee for the junior Olympics in 1957 and cur- 
rently possesses the National Budapest Junior 
Championship. 



Regis' Bob Bowles and Academy opponent meet for traditional handshake 
after each score. 



Bill lombardo scores on an epee encounter with Cadet. 



-. 





Bob Bowles helps Becker fit his mask and offers a few words of 
encouragement. 




Balance and concentration on the opponent's tactics results in a successful thrust for 
Regis' Bill Lombardo. 



A well-placed thrust and the opponent loses his foil. 



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'Touch" football is the favorite intramural sport in the early fall. 






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INTRAMURAL 



FOOTBALL 



With thirteen teams enthusiastically hailing 
the introduction of the intramural football sea- 
son, there was definitely no lull in spirit with 
the beginning of the fall semester. 

Jerry Sherman capably took over the pro- 
gram this year and set up a new type schedule 
providing six games for each team and a 
tournament for the top four teams at the sea- 
son's end. 

At the start of the season, Team Without A 
Name with standouts "Duggie" Dugan and 
"Moon" Miller and ADG with John McCoy and 
"Rock" Doherty looked like the teams that 
would roll. They did, and landed in the tour- 
nament along with the Seven Mules and the 
Lushers. 

In the first round, the Seven Mules upset 
the Team Without A Name and then went all 
the way to the finals to face the ADG's. In one 
of the best games ever played in the intra- 
mural tourney, the underdog Seven Mules held 
the ADG's scoreless and took the tournament 
crown with a 7-0 win. 



Jim Crowley calls the signals as the 
mural league line up for the play. 






John Mahoney successfully snares a pass but Jim Crowley 
isn't planning to let him get far. 




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Mark Peddecord arrives on the field with an 
eager group of recruits, including Crowley, 
McGrath, and Coffey. 







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Steve French breaks through the line behind a charging 
Walt Sagara as Dan McGrath closes in for the tackle. 



Dan Dalpes looks downfield for a receiver. 



All-intramural French plunges over the goal line. 



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INTRAMURAL 

BASKETBALL 



W ith the usual amount of spirit and body contact, the 
1960 intramural basketball season began action on 
January 18th. A record number of enthusiasts entered 
the competition this year so that two leagues had to 
be set up, each consisting of eleven teams. 

The first requisite for a team is, of course, a name; 
and a glance at the roster definitely revealed as much 
imagination in the names as was to later be seen in 
the playing — Coiony Wines, Happy Hebrews, Misfits. 

The three top returning teams, the Aigo's, ADG, 
and Hurricanes brought back such familiar faces as 
Mueller, Dunn, Bailey, Haushalter, and Ricken, while 
the freshman teams ushered in sparkling new talent in 
the persons of Tom Yax and Frank Armijo. 

After the first round of action, the favored Hurri- 
canes was the top-rated team in the A League with the 
defending champion Arqo's far down in the standings. 
In the B League, the Lakers controlled the top position. 

In the scoring race. Freshman Frank Armijo was 
tops with an average of 18.3 points per game. He was 
closely pressed, though, by veterans Ricken and 
Meuller and another freshman, Tom Yax. 

Due to the large contingent of teams forcing the 
schedule to run into April the final results of the hotly- 
contested race for the 1960 championship could not 
be recognized. 



The ball is in the air and the 1960 in- 
tramural basketball season is under way. 



Oh, get away— Let me have the ball this time! 



Eagle-eye Hitzelberger keeps a close watch on the action. 





Lawler, Kraus, Borer, and Lombardo all look longingly for the all-important rebound. 





Dan Eldridge climbs right onto his opponent's back to get 
little closer to the basket. 




Earl Gallipeau firmly ties up Bob Kraus in typical melee of the intramural world. 



Varsity form in the action under the boards is often exhibited 
by intramural enthusiasts. 






4ft 




Harry Marcotte effectively keeps Paul Maley from reach- 
ing second until the ball can get there. 



Members of the AKPsi spring contenders show the tension 
of the playoff game against Chi-Los. 



1 he early fall and the melting of the snow in the 
spring causes Regis scholars to turn from their books 
and wander to the thistle-covered baseball fields for 
a game of softball. 

Once the intramural league begins shaping up 
prime concern is to acguire a reputable pitcher; and 
the names of Jack Boyd, Mel LaBelle, and Bill Belford 
generally head the list. In the hitting field, the names 
of Harry Marcotte, Bill Quinn, and Don Cordova usually 
raise the most concern. 

The teams are drawn along either class lines or 
organizational lines with the Juniors and the members 
of AKPsi and ADG usually holding the edge in both 
departments of hitting and throwing. The freshmen are 
never completely controlled by the upperclassmen and 
their grim and fierce determination often places their 
opponents in the embarrassing half of the scoring 
column. 

Most of these games are merely preparatory for 
the real contests which are usually played at some 
mountain park for liguid prizes and which bring out 
the genuinely earnest playing. 





"Slugger" Bill Belford displays the form which has won for 
him the distinction of having broken the most bats in a 
single season. 



REGIS GOLF 



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Townsdin blasts out o sand-trap protecting one of the greens at the Willis 
Case Golf course. 



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Jim Obst watches silently as Sophomore Bill Cochran putts out ahead 
of him. 





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Regis foursome including Jim Obst, Bill Cochran, Chuck 
Townsdin and Chuck Danchertsen, braves the spring cold 
to get in an early round of golf. 




BOU/LING 



1 he Regis IM Bowling League which was or- 
ganized last year was again a complete success 
under the guidance of Moderator Father Kelly, S.J., 
and co-ordinator, Dick Heil. 

Sixty-two Regis men turned out at Arvada Lanes 
in October to re-organize the league and fourteen 
teams were formed. These teams bowl according 
to the handicapping rules of the American Bowling 
Congress so that each has a more or less equal 
chance for the championship. 

Some of the "pros" returnning from last year's 
action were Dennis Starbuck, Al Zarlengo, Craig 
Hibbison, and Tom Landauer. Once again these 
men combined their talents to produce the Sand- 
baggers II who won the championship for the 
second year in a row. 

The highest individual averages were turned 
in by Landauer, Hibbison, Starbuck, and Jim Rauen 
with Landauer leading the scoring for the second 
year. 



This is the scene that thrills every bowler or would-be bowler and 
bowling second only to basketball in the number of Regis participants. 



ikes intramural 




Father Kelly, Regis' intramural bowling 
alley. 




Members of the League leading Sandbaggers II and their competitors check over the score sheet 
while Al Zarlengo keeps a close watch on the action on the lanes. 



( 




Friendly competition complemented with pure relaxation brings from forty to sixty students to the lanes every Friday afternoon. 



moderator for the second year, grits his teeth in determination as he expertly twists the ball onto the 




Tom Landauer the league's leading bowler begins his approach. 



, 



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i 








HPRHHv^" " - ^| 






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A memorable and lasting tribute 
Father Murray, Diane Talon, and 


is pa 
Mrs. 


id Father B. J. Murray, S.J., by Ted Foti, at 
Paul V. Murray. 


the annual ADG Winter 


Banquet held at the "Top of the Park." Looking on are 







E ducation is not just the classroom 



or laboratory, it is also the campus 



orqar\izotior\ which encourages 



special interests and abilities- 



Through such organizations we 



learn of leadership and co-operation: 



here friendships are gained, ex- 



periences broadened. 



ORGANIZATIONS 




SKI CLUB— Front Row: John McCoy, Tom Schneider, Jerry Sweetman, Jim Taylor, Jack Chojnacki, Ted Foti. Second Row: Pat O'Neill, Dave Kelly, 
Tom Copps, Mark Kimmel, Pat Ryan, Mike Klein, Kevin O'Keefe. Bock Row: Steve O'Brien, Bill Cochran, Bob O'Donnell, Pat Hughes, Vince 
Bocklage, Keith Meisel, Ted Kern. 



OFFICERS— Mike McCue, president; Jim Waters, treasurer; Mike 
Mayer, secretary; Jim King, vice-president. 




SKI CLUB 



Une of the most popular and active clubs on cam- 
pus, the Ski Club coordinates Regis ski activity. The 
club is open to all Regis skiers, with courage, determina- 
tion, and good sense as the only reguirements. Its mem- 
bers can usually be found at local ski areas, ranging 
from beginner's slopes to complex obstacle courses. The 
main purpose of the organization is to further student 
interest in the sport. The broken legs, sprained ankles, 
and sunburnt faces indicate the widespread interest 
which has been generated on campus. 

During the year, the group's main activity was the 
sponsorship of several excursions up to the ski slopes. 
The club also obtained rides to the ski areas for its mem- 
bers, scheduled intramural races, and conducted lessons 
for beginners in the basic elements of skiing. 

Responsible for the success of the Ski Club was 
Mike McCue, president; Jim King, vice- president; Mike 
Mayer, secretary; and Jim Waters, treasurer. 



R CLUB 



rtecognizing the achievement of varsity lettermen, the 
R Club consists of men who have earned a major or 
minor letter in some field of intercollegiate athletics. 
The ambition and interest of its members has achieved 
for Regis an outstanding reputation in the field of com- 
petitive athletics. 

Working in conjunction with Father Daly, S.J., the 
club strives to create a greater interest in sports among 
Regis students, faculty, and alumni and to assist the 
promotion of the various projects of the Regis Athletic 
Department. The club also promotes general welfare of 
athletes and publicizes athletic events. 

The officers of the R Club for the 1959-60 school 
year were: John McCoy, president; Ken Blick, vice- 
president; and Frank Blatter, secretary. Under their 
guidance, the club has established a tradition of physi- 
cal strength and good sportsmanship for future Regis 
athletes. 




OFFICERS— Ken Blick, vice-president; Frank Blatter, secretary- 
treasurer; John McCoy, president. 



R CLUB-Front Row: Tom Malley, Pete McLaughlin, Tom Hitzelberger, Jerry Tellez, Pete Christensen. Back Row: Gary DeMarlie, George Falagrady, 
Paul Frey, Kenton Williams, Jerry Sherman, Mike Mayer, Dick Hoogerwerf. 





DENVER CLUB 

IVlore than half of the Regis student body is made 
up of day students. In order to give this portion 
of the school a more active participation in campus 
life, the Regis College Denver Club was founded. 

In September, members of the organization met 
incoming freshmen at the depot and the airport and 
drove them to the college campus. This service was 
repeated after Christmas vacation. 

Working in conjunction with the Denver Clubs 
of Loretto Heights and Colorado Woman's College, 
the Denver Club sponsored a number of social 
events throughout the past year. Perhaps the most 
successful was the first mixer of the school year 
held at Loretto Heights. During Christmas vacation, 
club members held their legendary Christmas carol- 
ing party. The organization also sponsored blonde 
beauty Anne Batt for Regis gueen. 

Officers for the year were: Paul Horan, presi- 
dent; William Marvel, vice-president; Mark Kimmel, 
secretary-treasurer. 



OFFICERS— Bill Marvel, vice-president; R. Paul Horan, president; 
Mark Kimmel, secretary-treasurer. 



DENVER CLUB— Front Row: Andy Hudson, Mike Barbich, Mark Reinecke, Charles Saavedra, Tom Scaglia, Peter McLaughlin. Back Row: Tom Constan- 
tine, Phil Farley, Fred Bischofberger, Craig Hibbison, Larry Beirich, George Coughlin, Ed Cahill. 





I \ 



DENVER CLUB— Front Row: John Robinson, Jerry Tellez, Bob Christensen, Jack Gallagher. Back Row: Dan Beshoar, George Falagrady, Jim Ben- 
nett, Walter Figuriniak, Fred Albi. 



Denver Club members Andy 
Hudson, and President R. Paul 
Horan admire a poster of their 
queen candidate, Anne Batt. 





1 




IRISH REGIS ASSOCIATION— Front Row: Jerry O'Connor, Larry Rice, Ed Gallagher, Rich Murray, Tom Fitzgerald, Patrick Cudmore, Larry Clin- 
ton. Second Row: Leo Smith, David Coffey, Tom Malley, Bill Buckley, Roger Mullaney, Leo McGee. Back Row: Mike Edwards, Tom Miller, Tom 
Figge, Patrick Geerdes, Jerome Dempsey, Paul Maley. 



OFFICERS— Pete McLaughlin, treasurer; Dave Eby, secretary; Rev. 
B. J. Murray, S.J., advisor; Dennis Gallagher, president; Rev. 
Matthew R. Lynch, S.J., moderator; Pat Hughes, vice-president; 
Tom Cullen, Sgt.-at-arms. 




IRISH REGIS 

ASSOCIATION 

In answer to the many requests of loyal Regis Irish- 
men, the Irish Regis Association was organized this 
year by Mr. Irishman himself, Dennis Gallagher. The 
purposes of this young, but growing, organization are: 
to promote knowledge of Irish history and culture, to 
acquaint members with Irish contributions toward the 
development of our country, and to create a new interest 
in the Emerald Isle. 

The two main projects of the Irish Regis Association 
were the sponsoring of lessons in the Gaelic language 
and in Irish folk dancing. The club also sponsored Linda 
Inman, an Irish colleen from Loretto Heights, in the 
campaign for Queen of Regis. 

The founding officers of the organization were: Den- 
nis Gallagher, president; Pat Hughes, vice-president; 
Dave Eby, secretary; Pete McLaughlin, treasurer; and 
Tom Cullen, Sergeant-at-arms. The Rev. M. R. Lynch, 
S.J., and Rev. B. J. Murray, S.J., served as advisors to 
the organization. 




IRISH REGIS ASSOCIATION— Front Row: Dennis Lawler, Bob Barnacle, Rev. Matthew R. Lynch, S.J., Mark Peddecord, Tom Connolly, Timothy Donovan. 
Second Row: Larry Wanser, Dan Devereaux, Pat Gallagher, Pat Dowd, Greg Peters, Jim Fisher, Tim McCue. Back Row: Richard O'Connell, Bob Hughes, 
Bob Martin, Jim Crowley, Dan McGrath, Thomas Sullivan, Steve O'Brien. 



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IRISH REGIS ASSOCIATION-Fronf Row: Dave Cullen, Bill Whelan, Jim Taylor, Tim Fitzgerald, Jerry Doherty, Michael Flinn, Terry Dooher. Second 
Row: Pat Cronin, Jerry Nordfel, Mike Costigan, Morrill Murphy, Mike Doyle, John Shork, John Hession, John Robinson, Mike McCullough, Paul 
Horan. Back Row: Randy Lump, John Gallagher, Phil Farley, Peter Rohan, Dave Hennegan, George Coughlin, Ed Cahill, Mike Horan. 




ST THOMAS MORE 



.fin organization for embryonic lawyers, the 
St. Thomas More Club was founded to acquaint its 
members with the workings of the law and govern- 
ment. Under its moderator, Mr. Donald Klene, the 
organization sponsored a series of lectures by promi- 
nent Denver attorneys and judges, including such 
notables as Judge Edward Keating. 

Another function of the club is to obtain infor- 
mation for its members on law school entrance re- 
quirements and to help members decide on future 
careers in the legal profession. The prospective 
lawyers held their bi-monthly meetings in the col- 
lege library. 

Officers for the past year were: Paul Horan, presi- 
dent; Frank Maggio, secretary; Mr. Donald Klene, 
moderator; Tom Stuart, recording secretary; Peter 
McLaughlin, vice-president; Mike Barbich, treasurer. 



OFFICERS— Paul Horan, president; Frank Maggio, secretary; Mr. 
Klene, moderator; Tom Stuart, recording secretary; Peter Mc- 
Laughlin, vice-president; Mike Barbich, treasurer. 



ST. THOMAS MORE— Front Row: Michael Barbich, Leo Smith, Bill Buckley, Larry Nau. Back Row: Walter Figurniak, Bruce Schilken, Mike Bisenius, 
Bill Houston, Morris Beddoes, Robert Mooney. 





SOCIOLOGY CLUB— Front Row: Al Gadbois, John Robinson, Mike Bisenius, Jim Schieferecke. Second Row: Pat Ryan, John McCoy, Fred Albi, Bill 
Buckley, Jerry Long. Back Row: Chuck Doman, Ron Moschel, Steve French, Bill Gregory. 



OFFICERS— Jack Schippers, president; Mr. Michael Endres, modera- 
tor; Kenton Williams, secretary-treasurer; Bernie Duncan, vice- 
president. 



SOCIOLOGY CLUB 



1 he Sociology Club is a relatively new organiza- 
tion on the campus. Founded to promote interest 
in the field of sociology, the club sponsors lectures 
and motion pictures dealing with juvenile de- 
linquency, crime prevention, and other social 
problems. During the first semester of this year, 
Judge Philip Gilliam of the Denver Juvenile Court 
delivered one of the most successful lectures of the 
academic year entitled "A Day in Court." An in- 
vestigator for the Denver Anti-discrimination Com- 
mission spoke on the work of that group and Mr. 
Donald Klene speaking before a joint meeting of the 
Sociology and St. Thomas More clubs discussed 
the sociology of the law. 

Officers for the club were: Jack Schippers, presi- 
dent; Bernard Duncan, vice-president; Ken Wil- 
liams, secretary-treasurer. Moderator was Mr. 
Michael Endres. 





ALPHA DELTA GAMMA— Front Row: Jerry Morrison, Tom Schneider, Bill Cochran, Jack Gallagher, Tom Copps. Second Row: Charlie Brown, 
Tom Sullivan, Tom Constantine, Ray Frenchmore, Pat Ryan, Kevin O'Keefe. Back Row: Andy Hudson, Don Cordova, Gary Doherty, John McCoy, 
Grant Wade, Dennis McDaniel, Tom Brennan. 



OFFICERS— Pat O'Neill, treasurer; Terry Welsh, president; Don Pa- 
checo, secretary; Ted Foti, vice-president. 




ALPHA DELTA QAMMA 

U nder the capable leadership of its president, 
Terry Welsh, Alpha Delta Gamma has found the 
school year of 1959-60 very successful and profitable. 
The aim of this fraternity is to produce leaders who 
will be outstanding examples of Catholic education 
during school and the following years. 

With hard work and persistence as their theme, 
the Brothers of Alpha Delta Gamma canvassed the 
city soliciting advertisements for the RANGER. Such 
a contribution is typical; it is one reason the fra- 
ternity enjoys the reputation its does as one of the 
top service organizations on campus. 

The outstanding event of the fraternity's social 
season was the annual Coronation Ball, held at the 
Lakewood Country Club. Another big event was the 
Halloween dance which proved a fun-filled evening 
for Regis students and their dates. For its own 
members, the fraternity held two banquets and sev- 
eral pinning parties. The group also held monthly 
Communion breakfasts to which outstanding leaders 
of the community were invited to speak. 

Other officers in this organization were Ted Foti, 
vice-president; Don Pacheco, secretary; and Pat 
O'Neill, treasurer. 



In charge of chow at the Alpha 
Delta Gamma picnic for students of 
the State Industrial School are Jerry 
Sweetman, and Ted Foti. 




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ALPHA DELTA GAMMA— Front Row: Mike Mayer, Jim Obst, Jerry Sweetman, Harold Marcotte, Jim McCarty. Second Row: Mike Klein, Jim Ben- 
net, Ted Kern, John Hartmeyer, Frank Maggio, Chuck Jenkins, Buddy Guerrero. Back Row: Jim King, Jim Taylor, Ray Meyer, Jerry Haushalter, 
Keith Meisel, Fred Albi, Mike McCue. 




KREG RADIO 




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REG, which has become known as the 
"voice of Regis College," broadcasts from Sunday 
to Friday and distributes its time among thirty disc- 
jockeys who generally work in hourly shifts. The 
programming of KREG consists of music programs, 
news commentating, interviews, and special events. 

Prohibited by the Fedeial Communication Com- 
mission from broadcasting off campus, the activities 
of KREG have been greatly expanded on campus. 
A new addition to the radio station's programming is 
the piping of music into the Student Center. This has 
been met with great enthusiasm among Regis 
students. 

In its sixth year of existence, KREG has adopted a 
new policy of playing high guality music which 
benefits the college mind rather than the contro- 
versial form of rock and roll. In formulating this 
new policy, the station took a poll of student opinion 
which indicated a definite distaste for rock and roll. 

Officers for the year were Leo Huppert, station 
manager; Jim Lindeman, program director; Tom 
Harmer, publicity director; and Mark Reinecke, as- 
sistant program director. 



OFFICERS— Mark Reinecke, assistant program director; Tom Harmer, 
publicity director; Leo Huppert, manager; Jim Lindeman, program 
director; Bill Belford, studio manager. 



KREG RADIO— Front Row: Robert Cook, Tom Brennan, Tom Hitzelberger, Ted Barth, John Joseph Shork. Back Row: Quentin Ertel, Mike Mayer, 
Raymond Cheeney, Craig Hibbison, Tom Copps, Dan Hoskins, Jim Waters. 



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KREG — Front Row: Jim Godfrey, John Stark, John Mura, Dennis Starbuck, Ray Lamy. Second Row: Jerome Tojague, Ron Moschel, Pat Hughes, 
Grant Wade, William Graefe. Back Row: Bob O'Donnell, Jack Becker, Richard Pittlekow, Pat Klein, Tim Kimsey, Pete McLaughlin. 



Pat Klein and Dick Pittlekow "spin 
some wax" for their listerners on 
one of the regular KREG programs 
offered. 





ST. JOHN BERCHMAN'S— Front Row: Quentin Ertel, Don Mildenberger, Jim Arvidson, Dennis Gallagher, Pat Hughes. Second Row: Dan Deveraux, 
James Crowley, John Thorsen, Peter Rohan, Joe Hernandez. Back Row: Pete McLaughlin, Greg Peters, Pat Dowd, Charles Buddinger, Jim King. 



OFFICERS— Jerry King, president; Ron Moschel, vice-president; Leo 
Smith, secretary-treasurer. 




ST. JOHN BERCHMAN 



JT erhaps the most unnoticed of all organizations, 
the St. John Berchmcm Society performs one of the 
most important functions on campus. The members 
of the club offer their services in assisting at the fifty 
masses which are offered daily on the campus. By 
their unselfish perseverance and determination, they 
directly aid in the spiritual enrichment of the stu- 
dent body. 

Although serving at 6:30 mass might tend to- 
wards inconvenience and hardship, the members 
consider it an honor and a privilege by which they 
can come closer to Christ and His graces. 

Through its dedication to Christ and service to 
the school, the St. John Berchman Society has steadi- 
ly increased in size and service. The Rev. Eugene 
Kelly S.J., acted as moderator of the society. Jerry 
King, as president, headed the group; while Ron 
Moschel, vice-president, and Leo Smith, secretary- 
treasurer, assisted him. 



Ed Feulner and Jerry King carry out 
one of the manifold duties of 
those who participate in the St. 
John Berchman's Society. 




ST. JOHN BERCHMAN— Front Row: Dallas Plese, John Mura, Ray Lamy, Leo Huppert, Robert White. Second Row: Ralph Spinuzzi, Rich Thill, Ed 
Feulner, Dennis Kiefer, Bill Graefe. Back Row: Dennis Dalpes, Dan Dalpes, Mike Cassidy, Roger Mullaney, John Shork. 





OFFICERS— Barry Dawson, vice-president; Mr. Rudy Sporich, mod- 
erator; Bill Meiers, treasurer; Lou Doyle, president; Tom Tracy, sec- 
retary; George Martelon, chapter advisor; Jim Clark, master 
of rituals. 



ALPHA KAPPA P5I 



1 he purposes of Alpha Kappa Psi are to further 
the individual welfare of its members and to give 
service to the school. The largest business fraternity 
in the world, Alpha Kappa Psi was organized in 
1904. The Gamma Sigma chapter has been on cam- 
pus since 1954. 

Membership is open to all business majors who 
meet the reguirements set down by Regis College. 
Each year the fraternity holds two pledge classes 
to admit members. 

Among the major activities of the fraternity dur- 
ing the year were the sponsorship of a Regis 
publicity booth at City Auditorium and the fall and 
spring college lecture series. The brothers also 
sponsored the highly successful fourteenth annual 
Presentation Ball at the Brown Palace West Hotel. 
For the benefit of its own members, the fraternity 
held banguets, parties, and monthly communion 
breakfasts at which they were usually addressed by 
successful businessmen of the area. 

Each year Alpha Kappa Psi presents a scholar- 
ship to the highest ranking senior business major and 
an award to the outstanding alumnus. 

President of the fraternity was Lou Doyle. As- 
sisting him were Barry Dawson, vice-president; Tom 
Tracy, secretary; Bill Meiers, treasurer, and Jim 
Clark, master of rituals. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI— Front Row: Robert Lennon, Phil Beauvais, Jim Godfrey, Dick Pittlekow. Second Row: Lawrence Blackford, Pete O'Neal, Ferman 
Bischofberger, Tom Linnebur, Bill Quinn. Back Row: Dick Wallner, John Foley, Mike Wells, Bill Greiten, Bill Graefe. 




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ALPHA KAPPA PSI— Front Row: Jim Gottschalk, Ken Joule, Bob Etzkorn, John Kosednar, Gene Mueller. Second Row: Steve Compton, Jim Cabela, 
Chris O'Donnell, George Luchetta, Lou Caricato. Back Row: Bill Whelan, Mario Mapelli, Joe Ryan, Ken Blick, Walt Swirczynski, Lawrence Marrin. 



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Doyle and Bill Greiten 
fraternity sponsored 




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SODALITY 

r\s the oldest organization on campus, the Regis 
Sodality has grown and progressed with Regis since 
1878. Devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the or- 
ganization is made up of those students who wish 
to be more than ordinary Catholics. The primary 
aims of the Sodality are the Christian perfection of 
its own members and others and the defense of the 
Church. 

In order to further its aims of self-perfection, the 
Sodality stresses the daily spiritual exercises of 
Mass, rosary, meditation, and examination of con- 
science. Sodality members also teach catechism at 
the State Reformatory and various Denver parishes 
and work at old folks homes. One of the Sodality's 
main projects is the annual Halloween party which 
is held for orphans in the Denver area. The Presi- 
dent's reception and the annual Awards Banguet, 
both of which are main events in the Regis social 
calendar, are also Sodality projects. 

The Sodality planned two new activities this 
year. A closed retreat was planned for the new 
Jesuit retreat house at Sedalia, Colorado; and a 
Christmas program was planned for Regis students 
before they left for the holidays. 



OFFICERS— Bob Swanson, secretary; Gene Mueller, vice-prefect; 
Rev. Harry Klocker, S.J., moderator; Mike Roblee, treasurer; Dick 
Kelly, prefect. 

SODALITY— Front Row: Steve Telatnik, Larry Rice, Derry Rohlfing, Jerry King, Charles Roitz, Roger Milbert. Back Row: Gil Rael, Peter Rohan, Joe 
Charpentier, Pat Dowd, Ron Moschel, Greg Peters, Bill Cochran. 




Two socialists romp with their 
charges at the Sodality's annual 
party for the orphans which is held 
each fall. 




SODALITY — Front Row: Bob White, Joe Hernandez, Dennis Gallagher, Vince Bocklage, Jim Arvidson, Jack Schippers, Nick Cinocco, Dan Deveraux. 
Second Row: Bob Vescovo, Lou Gallipeau, Mark Peddecord, Ed Feulner, John Herzog, Mike Flaherty, Larry McDonough, Glenn Johnson. Back 
Row: Leo Smith, Dan Diehl, Chris O'Donnell, Bob Nawrocki, Maurice Mahli, Ted Paulbeck, John McMahon, Jim Figge. 





RHO CHI SIGMA Front Row: Mark Reinecke 
Eby, Mike Cassidy, Wayne Davis, Jim Yax. 



Derry Rohlfing, Dick Hilmer, Dennis Gillen. Back Row: Dennis Sietz, Jim Waters, Dave 



OFFICERS— Bob Pipkin, vice-president; George Coughlin, treasurer; 
Mike Burke, president; Steve Telanik, secretary; Bill Belford, 
pledgemaster. 




RHO CHI SIGMA 

Founded by Rev. T. Louis Keenoy, S.J., in 1946, 
Rho Chi Sigma offers its members an opportunity 
for intellectual advancement and brothership under 
the common bond of chemistry. The fraternity is 
open to all chem majors and to all pre-medical and 
pre-dental students who have an active interest in 
the science of chemistry. Pledging for prospective 
members is conducted in the fall semester. 

In order to advance its goals, Rho Chi Sigma 
conducts an active study program. During the past 
year, the brothers were privileged to hear various 
lectures by faculty members and visiting professional 
men on topics of current interest in the chemical 
field. Also, several tours of Denver area labs were 
conducted. Each year the fraternity presents an 
award to the senior chemistry major who has shown 
the highest scholastic advancement. 

Under the moderation of Dr. Francis J. Ozog, the 
officers of Rho Chi Sigma are: Mike Burke, presi- 
dent; Bob Pipkin, vice-president; Steve Telatnik, sec- 
retary; George Coughlin, treasurer; and Bill Bel- 
ford, pledge-master. 



An informal meeting of the Rho 
Chi Sigma members is held to help 
plot the fraternity's course for the 
coming year. 




RHO CHI SIGMA— Front Row: Jim Rauen, George Miller, Bob Eaton, Ben Cosimi, Dan Otero. Back Row: Joe Gisler, Pat O'Meara, Jim Gahl, Ron Distel, 
Pat Moore, Dick Buckmiller, Bill Zivic. 




Members of the east of the smash 
hit. The Matchmaker, take time out 
from dress rehearsal for a coke and 
a little "shop talk." 




PLAYHOUSE— Front Row: Rowena Stauffer, Dolly Calerich, Fred Albi, Mary Carole Dispense, Janey McLaughlin. Second Row: Peter Rohan, Jim 
Borman, Pat Cudmore, Tom Constantine, John Peto. Back Row: Richard Patton, Ray Lamy, Tim Fitzgerald, Ron Moschel, Richard Murray. 





PLAYHOUSE— Front Row: Barbara DiPilla, Annabelle Nimmo, Gil Rael, Kathleen Jones, Mary Jo Catlett. Second Row: Jerry Dempsey, Val Grant, 
Tom Connelly, Dennis Kiefer, Pat Hughes. Back Row: Larry Marquez, Paul Fairchild, George Twining, Cornell Wamser, Larry Schmitz, Bill Truckey. 

OFFICERS: Dennis Gallagher, student manager; Larry Clinton, secre- 
tary; Mark Kimmel, business manager; Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J., 
moderator. 




PLAYHOUSE 

1 he Regis College Playhouse offers Regis students 
a chance to learn the theatre and its techniques 
while participating in the latest productions of Broad- 
way plays. Under the direction of Rev. A. J. Dee- 
man, S.J., the Playhouse offers cultural advance- 
ment and enjoyment to the student body. 

During the 1959-60 season, the organization 
staged two major productions. 

"The Matchmaker" by Thornton Wilder was pre- 
sented November 6, 7, 8 at Bonfils Memorial Theatre. 
This rollicking comedy was highly successful and 
was enjoyed by everyone who saw it. The cast in- 
cluded Dennis Gallagher, Pat Cudmore, Larry Clin- 
ton, Jim Borman, Gil Rael, Pete Rohan, Paul Fair- 
child, Richard Murray, Anna Belle Nimmo, Jane 
McLaughlin, Barbara DiPilla, Kathy Jones, and Con- 
stance Brown. 

"The Potting Shed" by Graham Green was pre- 
sented, during the second semester, at Denver area 
schools and hospitals. 

The officers are: Dennis Gallagher, student man- 
ager; Larry Clinton, secretary; and Mark Kimmel, 
business manager. 




DEBATE SOCIETY— Front Row: Larry McDonough, Maurice Gioga, Jii 
Jerry Doherty, John Hartmeyer, William Bell, Peter McLaughlin. 



Hackett, David Suss, Bob Scarselli. Back Row: Paul Fairchild, Jim Rogers, 



OFFICERS— R. Paul Horan, president; Tom Scaglia, vice-president; 
Rev. Charles Kruger, S.J., moderator; Walt Figurniak, treasurer- 
Grant Wade, secretary; Al Gerstner, librarian. 




DEBATE SOCIETY 

L ounded to promote the time-honored institution of 
the college debate, the Regis College Debating So- 
ciety has clicked off almost a dozen meets and 
several thousand miles during the past year. 

Discussing the guestion, "Resolved, that the Con- 
gress of the United States shall have the power to 
override decisions of the Supreme Court," members 
of the organization have ranged as far afield as 
Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois. Other places 
visited during the past year include the U.S. Air 
Force Academy, the University of Omaha, Colorado 
University, and Denver University. 

The club also promotes work in the fields of 
oratorical and dramatic declamation. 

Officers for the past year have been: Paul Horan, 
president; Tom Scaglia, vice-president; Grant Wade, 
secretary; Walter Figurniak, treasurer; and Allen 
Gerstner, librarian. Moderator of the group is the 
Rev. Charles Kruger, S.J. 



BROWN & GOLD 

1 he crims and goals of the Brown and Gold, Regis' 
biweekly newspaper, are many and varied. They 
include acting as a sounding board for student 
opinion, reporting current affairs on campus, editor- 
ializing school controversies, and publicizing upcom- 
ing events. At the end of the year, the Brown and 
Gold presents an award to the outstanding senior. 

In addition to serving the school, the paper gives 
its staff a working knowledge of journalism and 
practical experience in meeting deadlines (there are 
12 of them during the year). For example, on one 
certain night during the past year 33 cups of coffee 
and 267 cigarettes were consumed by staff mem- 
bers preparing the Brown and Gold for publication. 

As a reward for such efforts, a banguet is held 
for the entire staff at the end of the year. 

Editor-in-chief for this year was Ken Joule. John 
Kosednar was the assistant editor; Bill Marvel, fea- 
ture editor; John McCoy, sports editor; Jerry King, 
Business Manager; and Larry Taylor, Photographer. 
Father Wintergalen, head of the Economics Depart- 
ment, is the moderator of this organization. 




OFFICERS — Larry Taylor, photographer; John Kosednar, assistant 
editor; Rev. Edward Wintergalen, S.J., moderator; Ken Joule, editor- 
John McCoy, sports editor; Bill Marvel, feature editor. 

BROWN AND GOLD— Front Row: Bill Truckey, Jim Godfrey, Tom Hitzelberger, Lou Doyle. Second Row: John Chojnacki, Bob Lennon, Jerry King, 
Pete McLaughlin, Jim Borman. Back Row: Randy Lumpp, Dan Otero, Jim Taylor, Dennis Gallagher, John Foley, Mike Roblee. 








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ITALIAN CLUB 



JYL any of Italian descent have their share of fun and 
activities by constituting one of the most influential clubs 
on campus. Those who were at the helm of the organiza- 
tion this year proved roost effective in steering the group 
toward and closer to its goal. Al Zarlengo was the natural 
choice for president and backing him were George Fala- 
grady, Vice Pres.; Richard Lamirato, Treasurer; Lou Cari- 
cato, Sgt.-at-Arms, and Al Rossi, Secretary. 

Parties for its members, may they have been mountain 
or house, were among the more colorful activities planned 
by these sons of old Italy. The running of a beautiful Irish 
girl, such as Susie Sullivan, for Queen of Regis gave them 
the prestige they truly deserved and although not vic- 
torious, the campaign was used as a rallying point for all 
its members and a closer unification was observed through- 
out the remaining year. 



OFFICERS— Lou Caricato, Sgt.-at-Arms; Dick Lamirato, secretary; Al 
Rossi, vice-president; George Falagrady, treasurer; Al Zarlengo, 
president. 



ITALIAN CLUB— Front Row: Chuck Jenkins, John Mura, John Gallagher, Dave Vostrejs, John Cometto. Back Row: Skip Gioga, Paul Johnson, Val 
Grant, Ken Blick, Bill Perry, Robert Scarselli. 





ITALIAN CLUB— Front Row: Gary Caglia, Bob Tafoya, Mario Mapelli, Fred Mauro, Ray Perry, Don Bruno. Back Row: Charles Dalla, Pat Eicker, Dave 
Vitry, Bill Houston, Lloyd Roatch, Joe Pedotto, Gary Polidori, Don Glinsky, Jerry Long. 



Members of the Italian club are 
shown enjoying one of their 
regular club meetings. 





Members of the Acquinas Academy listen attentively to a discussion of Plato's Republic. 



OFFICERS: Ben Cosimi, president; Rev. Harry Klocker, moderator; 
Frank Maggio, secretary. 




ACQUINAS ACADEMY 



1 he purpose of the Regis College Aquinas Academy is to 
develop an insight into the varied problems of philosophy 
among its members. To further this aim, the members read 
and discuss representative works from the ancient, me- 
dieval, and modern periods of philosophy. 

Plato's Republic was the topic of this year's dis- 
cussions. During their evening meetings in the Student 
Center lounge, members listened to lectures and discussed 
the thoughts of the ancient Greek philosopher. 

The academy is made up of Regis students who are 
majors in philosophy or who have a special interest in 
the subject, professors and students from local colleges, 
and professional men and women from the Denver area. 
Moderator of the Club is the Rev. Harry Klocker, S.J., 
Father Klocker is the head of Regis' philosophy department 
and author of a new book, Thomism and Modern Thought 
and holds a degree in philosophy from the Gregorian 
University in Rome. Officers for the year were Ben Cosimi, 
president, and Frank Maggio, secretary. 



LITERARY CLUB 



Principle project of the Regis College Literary Club 
this year was participation in the annual Jesuit Essay 
Contest. Members of the organization submitted origi- 
nal papers on the subject "Who is the Hero on the 
Catholic College Campus?" 

The club, founded to promote contemplation and 
discussion of the best in contemporary and classical 
English literature, also studied the possibilities of 
founding a campus literary magazine. In the past, 
the club has participated in numerous seminars and 
roundtable discussions and has, from time to time, 
appeared on weekly television shows sponsored by 
Regis. 

Club officers for the past year were Bill Marvel, 
president, and John Deasy, vice-president-secretary. 
The Rev. Robert Boyle, S.J., was moderator of the group. 




OFFICERS: Bill Marvel, president; Rev. Robert Boyle, S.J., moderator; 
John Deasy, secretary. 



LITERARY CLUB-Front Row: Leo Smith, John Koester, Mike McCue. Back Row: Jim Brisnehan, Donald Hirsh, Dennis Gallagher, Joe Tarabino, 
Peter McLaughlin. 









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THE RANGER STAFF 



Doarders returning to the campus late after a 
Friday or Saturday night on the town are oc- 
casionally startled to see lights on in De Smet 
Hall. The reason for this nocturnal activity is 
usually a frenzied RANGER staff working to 
beat a deadline. 

During the past year, members of the staff 
have taken and developed thousands of pic- 
tures, written enough copy to equal several 
dozen term papers and wasted enough time 
"goofing off" to publish a hundred annuals. 
Ring-master for this circus this year has been 
Senior Terry Welsh. Terry has spent hours 
assuaging the tempers of indignant copy writers 
whose copy had been cut, checking layouts for 
the activities section and nervously counting 
and re-counting finished pages. 

The RANGER this year had a difficult goal 
to strive for in meeting the quality standard set 
by last year's annual. But perserverence, 
imagination and, occasionally, panic have won 
out in the end. After the final deadline, mem- 
bers of the staff hurried home to hit the 
books and bolster up sagging grades. What 
has been a difficult task will have become a 
job well done. 




Deadline three days away, the annual staff hurriedly works to complete their assignments. 
Left to right: Cosimi, Feulner, Marvel, Nau, Meisel, and King. 




DICK HEIL 
Photography, 





LARRY NAU 
Copqwriter 



MIKE McCUE 
Advertising 










ft 



*5 



TIM CAMPION 
Copq Assistant 



JIM TAYLOR 
Business Manager 



TED FOTI 
Advertising 



MIKE ROBLEE 
Photographer 





Camera-shy photogs work in the darkroom: Mike Roblee, Mike Klein and Ed Feulner 
enlarge a photo for the RANGER. The photography staff worked tirelessly, taking 
pictures at every school function and spending long weekends developing the results. 



TERRY WELSH 
Editor-in-Chief 




FATHER BOCKLAQE, 
Moderator 




;"■¥'- ■■ 



r 



BILL MARVEL 
Associate Editor 




ED FEULNER 
Photography 



% 4r ■ 



BEN COSIMI 
Sports Editor 




KEITH MEISEL 
Class Editor 




MIKE KLEIN 
Photography Editor 




JIM KINQ 
Layout 




Friday night relaxation: Jerry Walrond, John Hartmeyer, Lou Caricato, and Ed Coughlin, leave the Federal Theater in North Denver after enjoying the 



joying the movie "Lil Abner. 



F^ 



The business firms who are fe 



atured 



or\ the following pages have all 



helped to make this annual possible. 
The RANQER STAFF, on the behalf 
of everu. Regis student is grateful for 
their generous advertising 



contributions. 



ADVERTISING 




"SACRED HEART" 



This page made possible through the courtesy of 

WILFRED G. EYRE 



m^ 




PAUL J. ROSSMILLER 



DONALD H. CULLEN 



PHONE 
GRand 7-4170 



MEMBER (NATO 



\{ R and C WHOLESALE CO. 

CANDY — GUM — CIGARETTES — TOBACCO — SUNDB/ES 
3616 TEJON STREET DENVER II, COLORADO 




Congraiulations to 
THE CLASS OF 1960 

GRIFFITH MOTORS, II. 



2770 North Speer Boulevard 
Denver 11, Colorado GRand 7-3313 




LOWELL DRUGS 

RAY & MAXINE CAIN 

4901 Lowell Blvd. 



Dress Properly 
For Special Affairs 

WE RENT DRESS SUITS 

for 

PROMS WEDDINGS 

FORMAL EVENTS 

Complete Line of Accessories 

C. B. GILLILAND &. CO. 

Formal Wear — Sales, Rentals 

1029 17th St. KE 4-3585 

Denver, Colorado 




fc^< 



£da lanes 



RUSSELL and BABE JONES 

5225 Wadsworth Avenue 
Arvada, Colorado 

HArrison 4-8121 
Reservations Week Ends 




MERKL'S SERVICE 
STATION 

4437 West 38th Ave. 

Denver, Colorado 




PROTEIN WHEAT— Bread like great grandmother made. A 
teaspoonful of natural wheat germ in every slice. No sugar. 
44 calories per ounce slice. 

SOYA WHEAT— Where regular bread supplies 20% starch, this 
loaf makes available only 9%. Rich golden color. No Sugar. 



WA 



delicious 



m -T - T r - T n 1 1 - _ miJiiiiii 



farm bread 



WHITE - WHOLE WHEAT - RYE 

True home style breads. No "Keep Soft" 
Chemicals used in any loaf. 




Compliments of Mr. James Clark 




GOOD LUCK 
REGIS MEN 



Remember for the finest in 
food and drink; where 
Regis men Meet. 



R Banquet room available 

r : *^M to Regis Men. 



ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 



Vi block off Federal on 44th 



DICK'S WHOLESALE, INC 



TOBACCO, CANDIES AND NOVELTIES 



R. A. OSTBERG-PRES. 



SUnset 9-1136 



2842 So. Broadway 



Englewood, Colorado 



The Most Rev. Charles 

A. Buswell, D. D. 

Bishop of Pueblo 

Consecrated, 

Sept. 30, 1959 

Installed, 
Oct. 6, 1959 




Compliments of 

The Leone Construction Co. 

Trinidad, Colo. 




Compliments of 

COUGHLIN & COMPANY 



SECURITY BUILDING 



DENVER, COLORADO 




SAVE TIME LAUNDRYETTE 

Student Rates 

Clothes washed, fluff dryed 

and folded 

Dry Cleaning — Shirt Finishing 

4224 Tennyson 
Gr. 7-0631 



reliable/- 




POTTER'S 
DRUG STORE 

Boulder's Prescription Pharmacy 

Phone Hi. 3-1050 
1207 Pearl Street 
Boulder, Colorado 



Compliments of 
the 

BYRD SALES 
CO., INC. 

Distributors of 

FALSTAFF 

America's Premium 
Quality Beer 




FALSTAFF BREWING CORPORATION. ST. LOUIS, MO. 



PAT AIELLO BIRCH TOLVE 


Frozen Food To Go GL-5-7702 


JIM'S PIZZERIA 


"KING OF PIZZA PIE" 


4748 Tejon St. Denver, Colo. 


Italian Spaghetti — Home Made Ravioli-La sag na 
Phone Orders to Go 


Open Daily 4 pm till 2 am # Sundays 4 till 12 
Closed Mondays 



You've Tried the Rest, Now Try the Best 



Quick and Dependable 
Service see 



NELSON'S 



CONOCO 



4900 Lowell Blvd. 



SERVICE 

Denver, Colo. 



Gr. 7-9960 



Compliments 

of 

Dr. & Mrs. L E. Haushalter 



The Record Shop Of Distinction 

Harmony Record Shop 

1511 Welton Street 

Everything in Recorded Music 

CH erry 4-2827 
Denver 2, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

Mr. & Mrs. 

John 

Doherty 

and 

a 

Benedictine 

Friar 



# 



*H f*AN C/s 




<r 




&<MHfdi*KeHt& o^ 




DENVER CHICAGO TRUCKING CO., INC. 



the ONLY direct coast-to-coast carrier 



East 45th at Jackson 
General Offices: Denver, Colorado 

Phone DUdley 8-4567 




LEUTHY'S KITCHEN 

5004 N. Federal Blvd. 

Good Food Pleasant Atmosphere 

Home Made Pies & Pastry 

Open From 7 a.m. To 8 p.m. 

Closed Sunday 



Compliments 
of 



Mr. & Mrs. Al. C. Gottschalk 



Garden City, Kansas 



JACK AND TEENEY'S 
BAR AND GRILL 



Best in Food & Drink 
Free Popcorn 

Known to Regis Men 
as 

"Sunnyside" 

4407 West 52nd Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



GEORGE T. ALLEN 

117 Sherman Road 
Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 



JAMES E. ARVIDSON 

502 North Tenth 
Keokuk, Iowa 



JACK N. BAILEY 

3275 E. Colorado Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 



KENNETH W. BLICK 

Roggen, Colorado 



JAMES F. BOATRIGHT 

3280 Pierce Street 
Denver, Colorado 



DENNIS W. BOONE 

3121 Gaylord Street 
Denver, Colorado 



BLAINE C. BOYENS 

5163 Clay Street 
Denver, Colorado 



JOSEPH BOYLE 

2497 Pierce Street 
Denver, Colorado 



WILLIAM M. BRADY 

721 Logan Street 
Denver, Colorado 



MICHAEL F. BURKE 

416 Aliso Drive N.E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



LOUIS A. CARICATO 

1345 Longwood Avenue 
Pueblo. Colorado 



MICHAEL D. CASSIDY 

2220 W. Clarendon 
Phoenix, Arizona 



ANTHONY J. CLOUTMAN 

57 Dearborn Street 
Salem, Massachusetts 

KEITH E. COLEMAN 

7180 Zuni Street 
Denver, Colorado 

STEPHEN J. COMPTON 

932 Pontiac 
Denver, Colorado 



LEO H. CONNELL 

4040 Mt. View Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 

DONALD E. CORDOVA 

318 7th Street 
Trinidad, Colorado 

BENEDICT A. COSIMI 

2401 E. 78th Street 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE COUGHLIN 

201 Jersey Street 
Denver, Colorado 



THOMAS R. CULLAN 

Route No. 1 
Hemingford, Nebraska 

BARRY T. DAWSON 

712 Newport Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN F. DEASY 

4850 Perry Street 
Denver, Colorado 

GERALD G. DENNIS 

4333 Perry Street 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM H. DINES 

775 Columbine Street 
Denver, Colorado 

DAVID C. DOBBS 

10150 E. Greene Street 
Silverton, Colorado 

TERRENCE E. DOOHER 

8787 E. Colfax Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 

LOUIS V. DOYLE 

504 W. Drman 
Pueblo, Colorado 




WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

2— Barbers— 2 

Best Service Before 3 P.M. 

ALL STYLES 

Shines on Saturdays 

HOURS 

8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

Tuesday Through Saturday 

5032 Federal Blvd. 



THE LAUNDRY CHUTE 
39th & Tennyson 

1 Day Service 

Shirts Fluff Dry 

Dry Cleaning 



Compliments 
of 



DOWNS SUPPLY CO. 



1 




A/krSix 


-*< ""; 










Compliment 
her taste 




by complementing 




her gown 




A 


in a tuxedo 




J 


By Alter Six 




^w 



%/ 



1?andaHs 



COLORADO SPRINGS 

9 E. Bijou-ME. 5-4447 

(Near Elks' Club) 



DENVER 
1611 Glenarm-AM. 6-06 
(Near Paramont) 9 to ( 
2241 S. Broadway-RA. 2-( 



A & J DRIVE INN 

Place your Order By Phone 

GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN & SHRIMPS 
BURGERS — FOOTLONGS 



1996 S. Federal Blvd. 



WEst 4-8494 



FELDMAN CAP CC. 

For All Your Cap Needs 

BEANIES, ROTC, 

BAND CAPS, ETC. 

1026 17th St. 

Denver, Colorado 

Al. 5-7007 



BERNARD J. DUNCAN 

Glenrock, Wyoming 

DAVID H. EBY 

1900 Cherry Street 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT L. ETZKORN 

3109 S. University Street 
Denver, Colorado 

RICHARD C. EYRE 

100 S. Franklin Street 
Denver, Colorado 

BLAIR K. FARRELL 

423 W. Kiowa Street 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

A. E. FREI 

2925 Locust Street 
Denver, Colorado 

RAYMOND FRENCHMORE 

112 W. Topeka 
Trinidad, Colorado 



PETER J. FURSTENBURG 

1143 Ash Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES F. GAHL 

3054 Vallejo 
Denver, Colorado 

DENNIS G. GILLEN 

363 Bannock Street 
Denver Colorado 

WILLIAM C. GREGORY 

202 Ceresco Street 
Climax, Colorado 

JAMES B. GUYER 

420 W. Mountain 
Fort Collins, Colorado 



DONALD J 

804 11th Street 
Rawlins, Wyoming 



HALL 



JOHN W. HARTMEYER 

11 Dak Road 
Muncie, Indiana 

JERRY L. HAUSHALTER 

8914 Jackson Park Blvd. 
Wauwatosa 13, Wisconsin 



RICHARD HILMER 

1035 S. Post Road 
Brookfield, Wisconsin 

ANDREW K. HUDSON 

3540 Milwaukee Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN F. JARAMILLO 

7035 W. 36th Street 
Denver, Colorado 

DANNY G. JIRON 

2426 S. Acoma 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS P. JOYCE 

4245 Knox Court 
Denver, Colorado 

RICHARD E. KELLY 

4828 Webster Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 

ANDREW M. KLEIN 

8420 Renner Road 
Lenexa, Kansas 

MELVYN J. LaBELLE 

5555 N. Federal 
Denver, Colorado 



JOSE LEON 

Box 561 
Agana, Guam 



GUERRERO 



james c. Mccormick 

412 E. San Miguel 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 



MIKE A. McCUE 

870 Oak Ridge Lane 
St. Paul, Minnesota 



DENNIS M. McDANIEL 

1651 High Street 
Denver, Colorado 

FRANK P. MAGGIO 

5050 Newton Street 
Denver, Colorado 

MARIO J. MAPELLI 

4520 W. 32nd Street 
Denver, Colorado 

HAROLD D. MARCOTTE 

110 Baker 
Salina, Kansas 



I STYLES FOR MEN] 


morris 

PLPERT 


PLAYBOY 



Denver's only 
Playboy store 

16th at Glenarm Sts. 




SAM'S 
Radio & Phonograph 

Specialist In 
Hi-Fi ir Stereo 

4974 Lowell Blvd. 
GL. 5-0744 



L G. L0WRY 
COMPANY 

General Contractors • Builders 

5933 Kansas 

HOUSTON 7, TEXAS 



LABATE'S 
Club Lounge 

7200 N. Federal 
Ha. 9-9034 



Compliments 
of 

Mr. & Mrs. 
Charles Flynn 

Chicago, Illinois 



All Regis Shops 
at 

KINNEY'S SHOES 

Collegiate Types in all 

Colors & Styles 

from $6.99 - 15.99 



GEnesse 3-6381 4030 Tennyson 

CENTER PHARMACY 

free delivery 

North Denver's Finest Prescription Dept. 

Les Lakey Bob Sumner 



WILLIAM M. MARVEL 

1170 Locust Street 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM H. MEIERS 

721 N. 3rd 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

KEITH J. MEISEL 

507 Gait Avenue 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 

RAYMOND F. MEYER 

16 Frost Avenue 
Ferguson 35, Missouri 

GENE L MUELLER 

Box 32 

New Baden, Illinois 

JAMES E. OBST 

4147 Hyer 
Dallas, Texas 

JAMES F. O'CONNOR 

3178 W. 41st 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS J. PARISI 

3540 Vallejo 
Denver, Colorado 



FRANK R. QUINTERO 

1364 King Street 
Denver, Colorado 



LLOYD H. ROATCH 

4122 King Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN A. ROBINSON 

1935 Yosemite 
Denver, Colorado 

DERRICK ROHLFING 

1212 Grand Avenue 
Grand Junction, Colorado 

DAVID A. ROTTINO 

2735 Henry Hudson Parkway 
New York, N.Y. 

PHILIP C. RUOFF 

3037 W. 36th Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN T. SCHIPPERS 

6401 Zimmerman N.E. 
Albuquerque, N. M. 



VINCENT L. SMITH 

Box 44 

Fairplay, Colorado 

DAVID L. SPREHE 

2212 N.W. 19 

Oklahoma City 7, Oklahoma 

ROBERT L STEIN 

1295 Eudora 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT J. SWANSON 

1117 S. Stone 
LaGrange, Illinois 

WALTER SWIRCZYNSKI 

3714 Trellis Court 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

ROBERT T. TAFOYA 

405 E. 7th Street 
Trinidad, Colorado 

JOHN M. TARABINO 

Box 777 
Trinidad, Colorado 

STEPHEN C. TELATNIK 

32319 Lake Road 
Avon Lake, Ohio 

JEROME R. WALROND 

19 Clayton Terrace 
Clayton, Missouri 

TERRENCE WELSH 

Route 2 

Great Bend, Kansas 

JAMES M. WETZEL 

3530 Milwaukee Street 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM J. WHELAN 

1382 S. University 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHNNIE L. WILLIAMS 

3293 Arapahoe 
Denver, Colorado 

EMIL B. ZIEGLER 

R.R. No. 2 
Quinter, Kansas 

WILLIAM J. ZIVIC 

11525 W. Center 
Denver, Colorado 



HICKS-DENVER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Brushes, Street and Road 
Brooms; also a complete line of Cleaning 
Supplies. 

1235 Stout 
Denver, Colorado 



char-broiler 
steak house 

steak dinner — complete $1.19 



1520 Broadway 
Al 5-5915 



Compliments 
of 



LINDAHL'S PHOTO SALES 

1637 Court Place 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 



TfM& eJU JACKS 



Shof* 



Barber Shop 



'for a really good haircut' 



MINNESOTA-WISCONSIN 



TRUCK LINES. INC. 




TWIN CITIES PHONE MIDWAY 5-4534 
EAU CLAIRE PHONE 5714 
ROCHESTER PHONE 33 11 
CHICAGO PHONE BISHOP 2-2182 



2280 Ellis Avenue 
St. Paul 14, Minn. 




CLARENCE CROSS 
CHARLES J. NAU 
COMPANY, INC. 



CROSS AND NAU 

Company 

221 NORTH LASALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS ANDOVER 3-1425 



GENERAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE 
AND MASONRY REPAIRS 



WATERPROOFING * TUCK POINTING * CORNICE REMOVAL * BUILDING CLEANING 



A*u& only the, Lett 

For the "REGIS RANGERS" 



ORIENTAL 
THEATRE 


44th & TENNYSON 
PH GR. 7-0171 


FEDERAL 
THEATRE 


38th & FEDERAL 
PH GL. 5-5148 


HOLIDAY 
THEATRE 


32nd & CLAY 
PH GL. 5-6843 


WESTWOOD 
THEATRE 


3333 W. ALAMEDA 
PH WE. 5-3606 


GOLDEN 
THEATRE 


GOLDEN, COLO. 
PH CR. 9-3444 


GOTHIC 
THEATRE 


ENGLEWOOD 
PH SU. 1-5515 


RITZ 
THEATRE 


1912 SO. BDWY. 
PH PE. 3-0134 


SANTA FE 
THEATRE 


10th & SANTA FE 
PH TA. 5-5586 


VICTORY 
THEATRE 


16th & CURTIS 
PH CH. 4-1557 



Only *1U fceti 
9*t Motion Picture* ZHt&Uaitutt&Mt! 



1 



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+ <JM 



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The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous 

IUIUY BROS. DISTRIBUTING CO. 



Your SUPERIOR Class of '60 

You are convinced your class is all of that, and as you make homes of your own in the years to 
come, you'll be sold on another Superior Class of '60: the 64 varieties of top quality sausage products 
bearing SUPERIOR BRAND and PICNIC BRAND Labels. 

2701-17 West Colfax Ave., Denver, Colorado 



Best wishes for your futures 



DENVER WHOLESALE MEAT COMPANY 




I 



SUPERIOR 



v \ i / 



sn. 



n§^r 



TRUCK BODY CO., INC. 

423 Lynch Street • PRospect 6-3784 • St. Louis 18, Mo. 



Standard or Special 

trailers built for 

your particular 

needs. 



'*** !f ^|p|fff| : 





pro trmfroWnt kmttvibn^jnniivitmi piriiTftmflfemWvft«Mjniihyi»<*rJ bnrlmni? J tmntmnt tmivnmtij jfre«wtimt| 

11™ 





^ 







For Additional 

Information 
Write, Wire, or 
Phone — Collect 



Best Wishes From 

Mr. E. P. McDaniel 



best wishes 
to the 

CLASS OF 1960 

from the 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

of 

LORETTO HEIGHTS 
COLLEGE 


THE 
REGIS COLLEGE PLAYERS 

wish to thank all 

those who lent their 

generous support to 

make the 59-60 

season the most 

successful in the 

history of the 

playhouse. 

Courtesy of Mrs. Etheline Dempsey 


Denver Golf & Tennis 

Ski, Golf, & Tennis 
Equipment 

1807 Welton 
Denver, Colo. 


Compliments 
of 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Walrond 


CARL'S PIZZA 

• 

"Where the Regis Crowd 
Gathers" 

• 

3812 W. 38th Ave. 


Compliments of 

BEN & KAY'S 

4305 Yates Street 
Denver, Colorado 



H. MAPELLI 



& SONS, 
INC. 




m^ 



ROLAND MAPELLI 






HERMAN MAPELLI 
Founder 



THE MANAGEMENT 




EUGENE MAPELLI 





THE PLANT 

Well trained personnel prepare meat products to 
customer specifications under the supervision of U.S. 
Department of Agriculture inspectors in modern plant, 
conveniently located in downtown Denver. 



THE PRODUCT 

Specializing in U.S. Choice and Prime Beef, a full line 
of meat products is always on hand to fill every 
need. All beef is properly aged in temperature and 
humidity controlled coolers. 




THE SERVICE 

Fast, efficient delivery service is provided in Denver, 
and from coast to coast with the latest in refrig- 
erated trucks. 



murphy-mahoney Chevrolet 

no. speer at federal 

GE 3-6241 


DREISBACH'S 

"The House that Steaks Built" 
Grand Island, Nebr. 

Compliments of 
Mr. & Mrs. F. T. Dowd 


MORRISON SEYMOUR INC 

Better marketing through Creative Advertising 

Specialist in preparation of 
Catalogs Radio Commercials 
Direct Mail Sales Conventions 
Envelope Stuffers Sales Exhibits 
Market Research Point of Sale 
Outdoor Advertising TV Commercials 
Product Publicity 

Recognized by ANPA - APA - PPA - OAA - NARB 
3800 West Vliet St. Division 4-4800 Milw. 8, Wise. 


Real Italian Dinners 
Mixed Drinks 


Good Luck 

to the 

1960 Grads 

"BOOTS" 
TEXACO SERVICE 

4990 Federal Blvd. 
Denver, Colo. 






GAETANO'S 

EXCELLENTE CUSINA 

FINE FOOD 

3760 Tejon St. 

Gl 5-9852 
Denver, Colo. 



Gowyurfiuattimb 



REGIS COLLEGE GRADUATES 



Class of '60 







MASTER 
HOSTS 



Wonderful Dobbs House 
Food and Beverages 

Banquet-Party 
Meeting Rooms 

Valley Highway at Speer 
Denver, Colorado 




In all of Denver 
Nothing can compare 

Country Club 

Atmosphere with 

Downtown 

Convenience 





Compliments of LORETTO HEIGHTS STUDENT BODY 




Fords 



O'Mcara ford 

Falcons Thunderbirds 

Denver's Largest Dealer 

1100 West Colfax 

We invite your patronage 



Trucks 




Come Around To The Central 

Saving is easy and convenient at Denver's friendliest 
bank! Central is easiest by far to reach by car, just 
minutes from the Valley Highway. Ten drive-in 
windows to give you immediate service, open 7 AM 
to 7 PM Monday through Friday. Or save by mail 
with convenient stamped envelopes provided by the 
Central. Save the easy convenient way at the Central, 
15th and Arapahoe. 



y 



TM W= C 



O O 



Central Park ... 1 5th & Arapahoe . . . Denver 1 7, Colo. 
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION • FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



f*& 




Sheboygan 
Summer Sausage 

"Marhoefer Meats Make Marvelous Meals" 

3 lb. stick, $4.50 in continental United States 
Send check or money order to: 

MARHOEFER PACKING COMPANY 

13th & N. Elm Street 
Muncie, Indiana 




ftf / 



Compliments of 
Mr. & Mrs. C. R. Walgreen & Family 




Compliments 
of 



Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Gallagher 



Compliments 
of 

NORTH DENVER DRUG 

5070 Federal Blvd. 

Serving North Denver Since 1924 
Fountain Service 

Gl. 5-6139 Gl. 5-9850 


DERNEHL-TAYLOR 
COMPANY 

Institutional Wholesale 
Grocer 

326 N. Water Street 
Milwaukee 2, Wisconsin 


Compliments 
of 

Mr. Jack McLaughlin 
COTTRELL'S 


Make a Date Tonight at 

"Uncle Malt's" 

WORLD FAMOUS 
TIMBER TAVERN 

(tell your friends) 


Open Daily 10 a.m. til Midnight 
Sundays and Holidays 8 a.m. til Midnight 

BEER DEPOT 

3.2 BEER 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Davis 
Ge. 3-4902 4231 W. 38th Ave. at Stuart 


THE ESKIMO SKI SHOP 

"for the finest in clothing 
and equipment" 

traditionally patronized by 
Regis and Loretto 

416 E. 7th Ave. Al. 5-2474 


hover 
motors inc. 

your authorized 
north denver ford dealer 

no. speer at federal 
ge. 3-6881 


Glendale 5-7623 

Don 's Photography & 
Cameras 

Cameras-Darkroom Supplies 

4018 Tennyson Street 
Denver 12, Colorado 



GROWING WITH DENVER 






^ 



fill 



~— 4 S ^'-« J^' 



itm 



Bankers Union Life's new Home office Building 
in Denver's Cherry Creek Business Center. 



Now in our 30th year 

Capital and Surplus 
over $2,660,000 

Over $116 in Assets 

to every $100 in Liabilities 

Over $58,000,000 Insurance in force 



SELECT TERRITORY 
California— Colorado— Idaho 
Kansas— Nebraska— Nevada 
New Mexico— Oregon 
South Dakota— Texas 
Washington— Wyoming 



An Old-Line, Legal-Reserve Company 
writing both participating and 
non-participating plans 



Top first year and vested renewal Commissions 
available for qualified Agents and General Agents 



We salute another great Denver Institution — Regis College! 

Graduates are invited to talk with us on splendid opportunities 
with our organization. 

BANKERS UNION LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

C. B. McCORMICK, PRESIDENT 



Denver 



Colorado 



Excellent 
Design 

Skilled 
Craftmenship 

Finest 
Quality 



ee=JEWELRY, INC=e 



ESTABLISHED 1924 



Diamonds 

Watches 

Silverware 

Jewelry 



Third Floor, University Bldg. 

910 16th Street - Ke. 4-6336 

Denver 2, Colorado 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HEIL 

PACKING 
COMPANY 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 





SECURITY OF DENVER 




Congratulations to the 1960 
graduating class. We wish 
you well in your future ca- 
reer whatever your chosen 
field may be. 



Compliments of 

SECURITY LIFE AND 
ACCIDENT COMPANY 

Home Office 
Denver Colorado 




wu/zlui w&lcomed . . . 

TIFFIN INN 

1730 So. Colorado Blvd. Denver, Colorado • Skyline 6-8311 

DINING ROOM 

COFFEE HOUSE 

GOLD SCREEN LOUNGE 



t J^*GA^ //v 



IN LUXURIOUS WRITERS' MANOR <f 




%v G D ^t 



Distributors of Sphercon Contact Lenses 



Denver WESLEY - JESSEN, Inc. 



1700 BROADWAY • DENVER 2, COLORADO 
ALpine 5-2031 



Ask Your Own Doctor About Contact Lenses 



COLORADO 
RENT-A-CAR 

Colorado's Finest Cars 
-Plus Services - 

Special Insurance Arrangement 
For Students 



1809 Broadway 



KEystone 4-6186 



Ski Specialists 
In Denver for 21 years 



SKIS, BOOTS, SKI CLOTHES 

SWISS CHALET 

1344 Broadway 
KEstn 4-6632 



Ski & Ice Skate Rentals 
Open Mon. & Fri. Evenings 



OLYMPIA Typewriters 



Portables 
Standards 
Electrics 



STAHL TYPEWRITER CO. 




926 17th Street 



MAin 3-1024 



KING'S COURT LOUNGE 
AND RESTAURANT 

An Oasis Between Regis 
And Loretto Heights 

1000 So. Federal Blvd. 
WEst 4-9688 Denver 



With Very Best Wishes 

Webb-Knapp 
Inc 



Room 1200 

1700 Broadway 

Denver 2, Colorado 



Best Wishes 

to the 

Graduating Class of 

1960 

UNION PRINTING & 
PUBLISHING CO. 

Denver, Colorado 



K GENUINE REGISTERED @ 
eepsake 

DIAMOND RINGS 



THE BEST 



CAMERON $2C 

Also $100 to 2475 
Wedding Ring $ 12.50 V 



KORTZ 
JEWELRY CO. 



912 16th St. 
Denver, Colorado 

Est. 1892 



Easy Credit Terms 



"SLIMS" 
Hill Top Tavern 

Beer • Wine • Mixed Drinks 



4907 Lowell Blvd. 
1 block from school 



PRESTON'S 

Skelly Service 

Welding Specialists 

3700 Federal Blvd. Gr. 7-9820 
Denver, Colorado 



EASTWAY INN 

BOB COBURN, Your Host 

Beer To Go Every Day 

Including Sundays 

Dancing Nighily 

Phone SP. 7-9879 

1128 East 6th Ave. 

Denver 18, Colorado 


^9J PONTIAC-CADILLAC ^ 

Paul Seifert, President 

3 Locations to Serve You 
6300 E. Colfax DU. 8-4881 
6201 E. Colfax Used Cars 
5685 So. Bdwy. Littleton 


DANCING IN THE 
COPA ROOM 

AT 
DENVER'S FINEST AND LARGEST 3.2 LOUNGE 

OUR POLICY 

"Loads of Fun at Reasonable Prices" 

SANDS LOUNGE 

1523 Gienarm Ch. 4-9730 


MULKINS GARAGE 

Body Work — Painting — Auto Repair 
Accessories 

4949 Lowell 

Jess Mulkins Prop. 

Home: GE 3-4456 Denver, Colo. 

GR 7-6770 


KORN'S 
Men's Shop 

"Specializing in clothing and 
sports wear for young men" 

412 16th Street 
Denver, Colorado 


Jack & Norma 
Welcome you to the 

LOG CABIN INN 

Good Food 6- Mixed Drinks 

3109 N. Federal Blvd. 

GL. 5-9846 


Compliments 
of 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK Jr. 

GRACE M. McCORMICK 



NEW 

COMFORT 
FOR YOU . . . 




From the new lobby to the bright, 
newly furnished room you'll 
sleep in, there's more comfort 
and enjoyment for you at the 
Shirley. It's your best Denver 
hotel value near shopping, trans- 
portation and ample parking. 




The Shirleq-Savot| Hotel 



EAST 17th AVE. AT BROADWAY . TA 5-2151 • DENVER 



nt&tst *&wv 





\LMA PISTON COMPANY 

..__.__ ._-,..._-__.._. t AUT oMOTIVE PARTS & ASSE ~ 

«u EAST MICHIGAN AVENUE, ALMA, MICHIGAN 



GENUINE PARTS DISTRIBUTOR 



Authorized Ford Parts Rebuilder 




Salt Lake City 
Los Angeles 

San francisco 






fgf 



£ >'< L L I ,. 





AUTO ACCESSORIES WASHING 

PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 



LUBRICATION 



ASHKER'S 




SERVICE 



4890 Lowell Blvd. 
DENVER, COLORADO 



JOSEPH R. ASHKER, PROP. 



GL. 5-7529 



SHANGRI-LA 

Where Regis is especially welcome. 

Open for banquets and parties 

Dancing every Fri. 6- Sat. night 

to Cy Young and his band. 

7199 No. Federal Blvd. 

HA. 9-9093 



Mr. D. V. Aentista 
Mr. B. J. Duffy 
Mr. Joseph Marotetti 
Mr. Ralph V. Mauro 
Mr. & Mrs. E. D. Taylor 
Mr. D. B. Shaners 



Denver, Colo. 
Denver, Colo. 
Denver, Colo. 
Denver, Colo. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Denver, Colo. 



Congratulations 
Class of "60" 

BILLY'S INN 




^\ 



44th at Lowell Blvd. 
Beer By The Pitcher Or Glass — Party Facilities 



advertising index 



A 

A & J DRIVE IN 228 

ALMA PISTON COMPANY 253 

ARVADA LANES 218 

ASHKER'S SERVICE 254 

ATOZ AMUSEMENTS 233 

B 

BANKERS UNION LIFE INS. CO 246 

THE BEER DEPOT 245 

BEN & KAYS TAP 236 

BILLY'S INN 254 

BOOTS TEXACO 238 

C 

CARL'S PIZZA 236 

CENTRAL BANK & TRUST CO 241 

CENTER PHARMACY 230 

CHAR-BROILER STEAK HOUSE 231 

CROSS & NAU COMPANY 232 

JIM CLARK 219 

COLORADO RENT-A-CAR 249 

CONTINENTAL DENVER 239 

COUGHLIN & COMPANY 222 

WILLIAM CROW JEWELRY 247 

CURDOLAC FOOD COMPANY 219 

D 

DERNEHL-TAYLOR COMPANY 245 

DENVER-CHICAGO TRUCKING CO 225 

DENVER GOLF & TENNIS 236 

DENVER WHOLESALE MEATS 234 

DICK'S WHOLESALE 220 

JOHN DOHERTY COMPANY 224 

DON'S CAMERA SHOP 245 

DOWNS SUPPLY COMPANY 227 

DREISBACH'S STEAK HOUSE 238 

E 

EASTWAY INN 251 

ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 220 

ESKIMO SKI SHOP 245 

WILFRED G. EYRE 216 

F 

FALSTAFF 223 

FELDMAN CAP COMPANY 228 

G 

GAETANO'S RESTAURANT 238 

C. B. GILLILAND CO 218 

AL GOTTSCHALK 226 

GRIFFITH MOTORS INC 217 

H 

HARMONY RECORD SHOP 223 

HEIL PACKING COMPANY 247 

HICKS-DENVER COMPANY 231 

HILL TOP TAVERN 250 

HOOVER MOTORS 245 

J 

JACK'S BARBER SHOP 231 

JACK & TEENY'S 226 

JIM'S PIZZERIA 223 

K 

KINGS COURT 250 

KINNEY'S SHOES 230 



KORN'S MEN SHOP 251 

KORTZ JEWERLY 250 

L 

LA BATES LOUNGE 230 

LAUNDRY CHUTE 227 

DOMENIC LEONE CONST. CO 221 

LEUTHY'S KITCHEN 226 

LINDAHL PHOTO SALES 231 

LOG CABIN INN 251 

LORETTO HEIGHTS S. B 240 

LORETTO HEIGHTS S. C 236 

LOWELL DRUGS 218 

E. G. LOWRY COMPANY 229 

MC 
C. B. McCORMICK 251 

jack Mclaughlin 245 

M 

H. MAPELLI & SONS INC 237 

MARHOEFER MEATS INC 242 

MERKL'S SERVICE 218 

MINNESOTA-WISCONSIN TRUCK LINES 232 

MORRIS ALPERT 229 

MORRISON-SEYMORE CO 238 

MULKIN'S GARAGE 251 

MURPHY-MAHONEY 238 

MURRAY BROS. DIST. CO 234 

N 

NELSON'S CONOCO SERVICE 223 

NORTH DENVER DRUG 245 

O 
O'MEARA FORD 241 

P 

PRESTON'S SKELLY SERVICE 250 

POTTER'S DRUG STORE 222 

R 

R&C WHOLESALE CO 217 

RANDAHLS 228 

REGIS COLLEGE PLAYHOUSE 236 

S 

SAM'S RADIO & PHONOGRAPH 229 

SANDS LOUNGE 251 

SAVE-TIME LAUNDRYETTE 222 

SECURITY LIFE & ACCIDENT CO 248 

SEIFERT PONTIAC-CADILLAC 251 

SHANGRI-LA 254 

SHIRLEY SAVOY HOTEL 252 

SOUTHWEST TRUCK BODY CO 235 

J. S. STAHL 250 

SWISS CHALET 249 

T 

TIFFIN INN 249 

TIMBER TAVERN 245 

TULAGI 240 

U 
UNION PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO 250 

W 

WARDS BARBER SHOP 227 

WESLEY JESSEN 249 

WEBB & KNAPP INC 250 



PATRi 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Adamich 


DNS 

Pueblo, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Fred Albi 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. B. J. Beauvais 


Pueblo, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank D. Beiser 


McAllen, Texas 


Mr. R. A. Berg 


Bridgeport, Nebraska 


A. E. Bocock 


Del Norte, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Alvin F. Borer 


Manitowoc, Wisconsin 


Mr. Robert L. Bowles, Sr. 


East Peoria, Illinois 


Mrs. Wm. Brown 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. Francis J. Budinger 


Springfield, Illinois 


Mr. Louis Caricato 


Pueblo, Colorado 


Dr. & Mrs. S. L. Chojnacki 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. Collins 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. John R. Compton 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. J. P. Constantine 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Gordon F. Copps 


Stevens Point, Wisconsin 


Mr. Ben Cordova 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Cosimi 


Denver, Colorado 


Helen C. Coughlin 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. R. L. Deveraux 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. J. J. Doherty 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. Michael Dursey 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Feulner 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Logan T. Finnerty 


San Mateo, California 


Mrs. Helen C. Figurniak 


Phoenix, Arizona 


Mr. & Mrs. P. J. Foley 


Wichita, Kansas 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank S. Foti 


Wilwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. H. Schuyler French 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Victor Frenchmore 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mrs. Marie Frei 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Gallagher Jr. 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. E. F. Gallipeau 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. Ned Gattos 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Gerlach 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Miss Mary Gioga 


Aguilar, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Harmer 


Rockford, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. George F. Harrington 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


Mr. Joseph W. Haugan 


Sidney, Nebraska 


Mr. & Mrs. Theo P. Hoogerwerf 


Moline, Illinois 


Mrs. John F. Herzog 


Wellston, Missouri 


Mr. Thomas Hopkins 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Glen P. James 


South Sioux City, Nebraska 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward T. Kelly 


Boonton, New Jersey 


Mr. & Mrs. Frank P. Kern 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



PATR 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Kraus Jr. 


ONS 

Keokuk, Iowa 


Anna Kosednar 


West Allis, Wisconsin 


Mr. and Mrs. Max Kudar 


Jackson, Wyoming 


Dr. & Mrs. A. J. Lambardo 


Omaha, Nebraska 


Mr. Joe Lombardi 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. H. Marvel 


Denver, Colorado 


Mrs. Thelma McCabe 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. L. E. McCarthy 


Winnetka, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Jack McLaughlin 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Louis Meyer 


Normandy, Missouri 


Dr. & Mrs. John M. Murphy 


Gross Pointe, Michigan 


Mr. & Mrs. Jos. Nawrocki 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Dr. & Mrs. Dayton O'Donnell 


Detroit, Michigan 


Mrs. Marie O'Neill 


St. Paul, Minnesota 


Mr. Milton L. Perry 


Detroit, Michigan 


Mrs. Alvin B. Peters 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. Michael Pomponio 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. John A. Reid 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Dillon J. Ross 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mrs. Wauneta M. Roth 


Goodland, Kansas 


Dr. & Mrs. A. Rottino 


New York, New York 


A. J. Sardello 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Seep 


Denver, Colorado 


Mrs. A. D. Sherman 


Hastings, Nebraska 


Mrs. Harry Singer 


Denver, Colorado 


Francis J. Smith 


Fairplay, Colorado 


Loren L. Straw 


Aurora, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Nick Sudor 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Dr. & Mrs. J. M. Sullivan 


Shorewood, Wisconsin 


Mr. Joseph Tarabino 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Tetsell 


Sterling, Colorado 


Mr. Ivan Thomas 


Littleton, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. R. E. Truckey 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. Carl Trusker 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mrs. Maury Wade 


Memphis, Tennessee 


Mr. George M. Wallner 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. James Warner 


Keokuk, Iowa 


Mr. & Mrs. James J. Waters 


Kansas City, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. M. P. Wetzel 


Clayton, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. William J. Welsh 


Great Bend, Kansas 


Mr. & Mrs. R. White 


Lincolnwood, Illinois 


j Mr. & Mrs. Gordon W. Winks 


Glencoe, Illinois 


Mr. George Winterer 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. Joseph Yezzi 


Albany, New York 



Archer, Richard P 



Backus, Patrick \A 
Bailey, David C 

Barbick, Michael 

Barth, Theodore J 
Bartz, Daniel D. 
Batt, Tom H. 
Beacom, Berald D 
Beardsley, Kirk B 



Bell, William E. 



Blic 



Frank E. 



Boatright, James F. 
Bocklage, Vincent F 
Bocock, Charles F. 
Boersig, George R. 
Boone, Dennis W. 

Brady, Raymond J. 
Brady, William M. 



65, 66, 187, 191, 193, 204 



161, 162, 167 



60, 192, 194 



student 



, lt 


Dalpes, Dennis M. 








Daugherty, Roy A. 












Deasy, John F, 




DeMarlie, Gary P. 




Dempsey, Jerome B 












Diehl, Danny C. 




Dingman, Bernard J 




Distel, Ronald A. 




Doherty, Garrett M. 








Doman, Charles G. 








Dooher, Gerald R. 


•>, 189 




Dowd, Dennis C. 




Dowd, Pat F. 




Downing, Thomas F 








Doyle. Michael P. 


), 1711 


Dugan, Paul V. 



43, 78, 188, 204 



75, 78, 175, 



160, 166, 169, 185 



Glinsky, Donald S. 
Godfrey, James P. 
Gottschelk, Jim C. 
Grabrian, Victor M. 



Gregory, William C. 



195, 198, 207 





78, 


188, 205 
78 










78, 149, 


87, 


176. 201 
201 
67 

60, 203 








80, 206 






Haffey, Mark D. 






80 






Hakes, John M. 






80 






Hall, Donald J. 






53, 133 


43 


78, 


187, 206 

67, 191 

78. 187 

78 


Hamilton, John R. 






61 












80, 189 






Harding, John E. 






80 


















78 

176, 200 
68 


Harrington, Geo. F. 






80 




87, 
















53, 


193, 206, 214 






Hasenkamp, J. Gerald 












78, 18? 


Haugan, F. Joseph 












Haugan, Thomas F. 






80, 97 






51. 171 


Haushalter, Jerry L. 






53, 133, 193 






Heeren, Ed L. 














Heidenreich, Robert 
























































Hernandez, Joe 














Herzog, John F. 






81, 201 








Hession, John R. 




























Hilmer, Richard M. 








44 






Hirsch, Donald J. 














Hitzelberger, Tom 


62, 153, 169, 176, 


185, 194, 207 








Hoogerwerf, Richard 














Hopkins, Thomas A. 














Horan, R. Paul 43, 62 


126. 137. li 


A, 187, 


189, 190, 206 








Horan, Thomas M. 
Hoskins. Daniel T. 
Houston, Wm. B. 






81, 189 
65, 69, 194 






51 


Hren, Stanley E. 
Hubbes, Dennis G. 






81 






















Hughes, Patrick L. 


69, 99, 11 












Hughes, Robert E. 
Humphreys, Harry 
Huppert, Leo W. 






189 

62 

62, 194, 197 



jer, Chas. 
Joe D. 



BSTc 



43, 78, 

165, 185, 

78, 

30, 33, 39 


205, 
187, 

186, 


177. 


201, 


212, 


68, 


68, 
187, 


188, 
190, 



nald D 



effrey, William 
enkins, Charles 
enkins, Patrick I 
iron, Danny G. 
ohnson, Clyde t 
Johnson, Glenn f 



153, 166, 167 



52. 182, 184. 172, 212 



82, 153, 154, 158, 161 



67, 165, 185, 187 



68, 153, 162, 



184, 172, 200 



Coffey, David E. 
Coleman, Keith E. 
Collins, John A. 
Cometto, John C, 
Compton, Stephen J. 
Conaghan, James A. 
Conlin, James S. 
Connelly, Robt. J. 
Connelly, Tom M. 
Connolly, Dennis M. 
Connors, Joseph M. 
Coslantine, Thos, 
Cook, Robert W. 
Copps, Tom R, 
Cordova, Donald E. 
Cosimi, A. Benedict 

Cougfilin', Ed, Ek 
Coughlin, George 
Cronin, Patrick L. 
Crowley, James P. 





67, 194 




67, 184, 192, 174 




48, 50, 192 








212, 213 




77, 189 




45, 77, 214 








67, 189 




174, 189, 196 



Gallagher, Patri 
Gallipeau, Earl 
Gappa, Richard 



68, 187, 189, 192, 208 



Kammer, Daniel . 
Kelly, David J. 
Kelly, Richard E. 
Kelly, Robert A. 
Kelly, Terrance E 
Kelly, William H. 



<ing, Raymond G. 
Ilein, Andrew M, 
Uein, Thomas P. 
Cmetty, Geza E. 



Kruse, G°erald 
Kudar, Max S 



153, 155, 


160, 


166, 168, 
69, 184, 


70, 184, 


1?3, 


82, 197, 

70, 186, 

82, 

196. 212, 


62, 
19, 33, 39, 54, 


196, 
112, 

62, 


177, 200, 

69,' 
70, 146, 
199, 207, 













ind 


Ic 


>x 












L 








Ochs, Roland P. 




72 


Seitz, Dennis J. 






202 










O'Connell, J. Martin 




84 


Seurer, Melvin Ed. 






85 












O'Connell, John R. 




72, 189 


Sherman, Jerome F. 


73, 153, 


161, 166, 168, 


169, 185 












O'Connor, James F. 




55 


Shoemaker, Gary A. 






85 












O'Connor, Jerry R. 




84, 188 


Shork, John J. 




64, 189, 


194, 197 


LaFoe, Louis P. 








70 


O'Donnell, Chrr.tophel 




59, 63, 199, 201 


Simon, Carl R. 






86, 166 


Lambott, Donald E. 








82 


O'Donnell, Robert E. 




72, 184, 195 


Sims, Robert E. 






74 


Lamirato, Richard T. 








208 


O'Keefe, Raymond K. 




72, 184, 192 








64 


Lamy, Raymond P. 
Landauer, Thomas C. 






70, 


195, 197, 204 


Clear, Bernard T. 




72 


Smith, George A. 






74 










O'Meara, Owen P. 




203 


Smith, Vincent L. 


57, 


188, 190, 196, 


201, 211 


Lawler, Dennis J. 








82, 177, 189 


O'Neal, Pete J. 




72, 198 


Spinuzzi, Ralph 






86. 197 


Learned, Michael J. 








70 


O'Neill, Patrick H. 




63, 193 


Sprehe, David L. 




19, 34. 38 ' 










62, 198, 207 






56 


Stanley, Tom F. 








Leone, George E. 










Ostber'g, Richard H. 




72 


Starbuck, Dennis E. 
















54, 193 


Otero, Dan L. 




59, 63, 203, 207 


Stark, John M. 






74' 195 


Lindeman, James J. 








70, 194 








Stein, Robert L. 






57 
64, 190 


Linnebur, Thomas A 








62, 198 








Stewart, Thomas B. 














70 








Stout, Louis 


86, 153, 






Lombardo, Wm. J. 
Long, Gerald P. 








172, 173, 177 
62, 191, 209 




p 




Straw, Raymond L 
Strub, Larry C. 






86 


Lowry, Jerry W. 
















Sullivan, Dean L. 




153, 161, 162, 




Lumpp, 'Randolph F. 








62, 199 








Sullivan, Thomas J. 






189| 192 








82, 189, 207 








Sussman, David R. 






86, 206 




Mc 








Pacheco, Donald N. 
Padilla, John J. 

Patterson, Leon E. 
Patton, Richard A. 
Paulbeck, Ted M. 
Paxton, James B. 




63, 134, 192 

56 

72 

72, 204 

63, 201 

72 


Swanson, Charles L. 
Swanson, Robert J. 
Swanson, Thomas E. 
Sweetman, Gerald P. 
Swirczynski, John P. 

Synoground, Clifford 






Si', 200 

184, 192 

74 

57, 199 

74 


McCabe, Edward C. 










Peddecord, Mark T. 




84, 149, 175, 189, 201 










McCarthy, George M. 








70 






84, 209 










McCarthy, Stephen J. 








83 






208 










McCarty, James B. 








70, 193 


Perry, Michael K. 




72 




T 






McCormick, James C. 








55 


Perry, Ray V. 




209 








McCormick, Terence J. 








70 


Peters, Gregory A. 




72, 189, 196, 200 










McCoy, John L. 62, 


164, 165, 


184, 


185, 


191, 192, 206 


Peto, John H. 




72, 204 










McCue, Mike A. 


55, 


1 /o, 




193, 211, 212 


Pfeffle, Robert F. 




72 










McCue, Timothy J. 








83, 189 


Pino, Thomas E. 




72 


Tabacco, Anthony 








McCullough, Mike J. 








189 


Pipkin, Robert D. 




63, 202 


Tafoya, Robert E. 






57, 209 


McCurdy, William B. 








70 






72, 195, 198 


Tarabino, Joseph A. 






64, 211 


McDaniel, Dennis M. 








70, 192 


Plese, Dallas W. 




44, 84, 197 






184, 189, 193, 


207, 212 


McDonough, Lawrence 








83, 201, 206 


Pol, Robert J. 




84 


Taylor, Larry R, 






74, 207 


McGee, Leo S. 










Polidori, Gary L. 




84, 209 


Matnik, Stephen (. 




67 


200, 202 


McGee, Thomas W. 








70 


Potter, Gary T. 






Tellez, Jerry 74, 153, 159 




185, 187 


McGrath, Daniel L. 








189 








TeMaat, Michael R, 








McGuire, Michael W. 








83 








Tetsell, Richard R. 






86 


McLaughlin, Peter J. 62, 


185, 186, 


188, 


195, 


196, 206, 211 








Theisen, Gerald B. 






74, 165 


McMahan, John C. 








71, 201 




Q 




Thill, Richard J. 






74, 197 


McNeill, Daniel M. 








71 






Thomas, Gerald W. 






86 


McNelis, David P. 








71 








Thorsen, John D. 
Townsdin, Charles L. 






74, 196 

86 




M 








Quinn, Michael F. 
Quinn, William J. 
Quinnt, Patrick J. 




84 

63, 198 

84 


Tracy, Tom J. 
Truckey, William C. 
Tsumura, Ted K. 
Tujague, Jerome L. 
Twining, George H. 




86 


64, 198 
205, 207 
87 
87, 195 
74, 205 


MacDonald, Neil M. 








70 




R 












Maggio, Frank P. 




54, 


135, 


190, 193, 210 








V 














82 














Mahli, Maurice 








62, 201 
















Maley, Paul A. 








70, 188 
















Malley, Thomas H. 
Maloney, John E. 
Mann, Edward J. 
Mapelli, Mario J. 
Marchino, John G. 

Marko, Eugene J. 
Marquez, Lawrence D. 




70, 


165, 


178, 185, 188 


Rael, Gilbert E. 
Rauen, James L. 




72, 200, 205 
63, 203 


Vescovo, Robert E. 






87 
64, 201 1 






54, 


54, 199, 209 

62 

133, 178, 193 

82 

62, 205 


Reagan, William F. 
Regan, Michael L. 
Reichert, Fred F. 




72 

84 

72 

72 

63, 186, 194, 202 








74 
87 
209 
208 


Marrin, Lawrence W. 
Martin, Fred E. 
Martin, Robert M. 
Marvel, William M. 
Maschinot, James F. 


54, 


,86, 


207, 


63, 199 

75, 82 

70, 189 

211, 212, 213 

62 


Reynolds, Thomas F. 
Rhoades, James T. 

Ricken, Donald J. 
Rillahan, Jerry D. 
Roach, James W. 
Roatch, Lloyd H. 
Robinson, John A. 

Rogers, James W. 
Rohan, Peter C. 
Rohlfing, Derrick 
Roitz, Charles J. 
Ross, Michael J. 
Roth, Robert J. 
Rottino, David A. 
Rudolph, Richard F. 
Ruppert, James G. 
Ryan, Joseph G. 
Ryan, Patrick M. 
Ryan, Thomas P. 




84 

73 

84, 188, 200 

73, 153 

73 

84 

56, 209 

56, 187, 189, 191 

63, 200, 207, 212, 213 

84, 206 

84, 189, 196, 200, 204 

56, 200, 202 

73, 200 

85 

73, 149 

48, 56, 138 

85 

85 

64, 199 

73, 184, 191, 192 

73 




W 






Massey, Kenneth J. 
Mauro, Fred A. 
Mayer, Mike F. 

Meisel] J. Keith 
Melendez, Lee T. 

Meyer, Ray F. 




63, 


184, 


83, 209 

185, 193, 194 

48, 55, 198 

184, 193, 213 

83 

71 

55, 193 

71, 200 




Wade, C. Grant 

Wallner, Richard D. 
Walround, Jerome R. 
Walsh, Jerome P. 
Wamser, Cornell J. 




74, 192, 


195, 206 
87 
87 

74, 198 
St 
87 

74, 205 


Mildenberger, Donald 
Miller, George S. 
Miller, Thomas J. 
Montera, Guy G. 
Mooney, Robert C. 
Moore, Patrick N. 
Moran, John D. 








83, 196 
63, 203 
188 
83 
83, 190 
71, 203 

63, 192 




Wanser, Larry L. 
Warner, James W. 
Waters, James J. 
Wells, Michael V. 
Welsh, Terry 
Welsh, Tom J. 
Werth, Eldon J. 
Wethington, Wm. J 




59, 64, 184, 

64, 

19, 3: 

45, 7£ 


87, 189 

87 
194, 202 
144, 198 
, 58, 213 
, 87, 192 
87 
74 


Morrisroe, John P. 








83 








Wetzel, James M. 








Moschel, Ronald W. 


71, 


191, 


195, 


196, 200, 204 








Whelan, William J. 




19, 35, 58, 


189, 199 


Muckenthaler, James 
















White, Robert E. 








Mueller, Gene L. 








55, 199, 200 




S 




Wickenhauser, Rex D. 






87 


Mullaney, Roger P. 








71, 188, 197 












74 








71, 


195, 197, 208 












153, 156, 157, 


158, 164, 


Murphy, Frank M. 








83 












165, 


185, 191 

58 i 
87 


Murphy, John M. 








83, 189 








Williams, Johnnie L. 




Murray, Richard J. 








84, 188, 204 


Saavedra, Chas. J. 






Winks, William R. 
















Sagara, Walter E. 






















Sanchez, Leo R. 




56 




















Sardello, Bert J. 




73 












N 








Sargent, Peter M. 




64 


















Scaglia, Thomas N. 




43, 64, 186, 206 




Y 
















Scarselli, Robert J. 




85, 206, 208 




















Scheetz, Gregory P. 




73 




















Schieferecke, James 




73, 191 










Nau, Lawrence J. 








71, 190, 212 


Schilken, Bruce A. 




85, 190 


Yax, Thomas J. 
Yezzi, Charles D. 
Yumich, George S. 






64, 202 

87 

75, 87 

74 


Nawrocki, Robert D. 
Norton, Dennis L. 
Nusse, Rodney L. 








84, 201 
63 

71 


Schippers, John T. 
Schmidt, James L. 
Schmitt, Chas. L. 




56, 191, 201 
85 
73 
















Schmitz! William' M. 




85, 205 




















Schneider, Tom F. 




64, 184, 192 












O 








Schoenebeck, Richard 




85 




Z 














Schreiber, Ron C. 




73 


















Schreivogel, Herman 




""' 




















Schropfer, Jerome H. 














O'Brien, Stephen 
Obst, James E. 




55, 


133, 


184, 189 
138, 179, 193 


Schwartz, Edward A. 
Schwartz, Ralph A. 
Sciortino, Sam C. 




73 


Zarlengo, Albert E. 
Zivic, William J. 






180, 208 
102, 203 



THE LAST WORD 



UeSmet Hall is empty; the Ranger office is dark and cold. As soon as this, the 
last word, is written, the final 65 pages of the 1960 Ranger will be sent to 
Newsfoto Publishing Company of San Angelo, Texas. 

During the past year our theme has been "The Human Element." At 
this time I would like to thank "the human element" that has made this book 
possible. It would be impossible to mention every person who made a con- 
tribution toward the success of this yearbook, but some were most outstanding. 
A tip of the hat to the student body for their general cooperation; the brothers 
of Alpha Delta Gamma fraternity who managed our advertising campaign 
and exceeded their quota; to Father Bocklage for his time and help. 

Special thanks to Newsfoto, Tony Darnell, who did a terrific job on 
the color pictures, and A. J. "Wish" Redd for his invaluable help in planning 
this book. 

My thanks to the staff. They put in many long, hard hours often giving up 
their weekends. A special note of appreciation must go to Mike Klein and Ed 
Feulner for their efforts in the photography department. 

As we lean back and relax, best of wishes to next year's Editor and staff. 
It's all over now and it's been a good year. The fieldhouse was completed 
and Regis continues to grow. By the time you see the 1960 RANGER for the 
first time, some of us will be preparing for graduation. What has been our 
year-long care and frustration will become your annual. If you are satisfied 
with it, it will become our pride. 



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Terry Welsh 
Editor 



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